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box-shadow

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Used in casting shadows (often called "Drop Shadows", like in Photoshop) from elements. Here is an example with the deepest possible browser support:

.shadow {
  -webkit-box-shadow: 3px 3px 5px 6px #ccc;  /* Safari 3-4, iOS 4.0.2 - 4.2, Android 2.3+ */
  -moz-box-shadow:    3px 3px 5px 6px #ccc;  /* Firefox 3.5 - 3.6 */
  box-shadow:         3px 3px 5px 6px #ccc;  /* Opera 10.5, IE 9, Firefox 4+, Chrome 6+, iOS 5 */
}

Thats:

box-shadow: [horizontal offset] [vertical offset] [blur radius] [optional spread radius] [color];
  1. The horizontal offset (required) of the shadow, positive means the shadow will be on the right of the box, a negative offset will put the shadow on the left of the box.
  2. The vertical offset (required) of the shadow, a negative one means the box-shadow will be above the box, a positive one means the shadow will be below the box.
  3. The blur radius (required), if set to 0 the shadow will be sharp, the higher the number, the more blurred it will be, and the further out the shadow will extend. For instance a shadow with 5px of horizontal offset that also has a 5px blur radius will be 10px of total shadow.
  4. The spread radius (optional), positive values increase the size of the shadow, negative values decrease the size. Default is 0 (the shadow is same size as blur).
  5. Color (required) - takes any color value, like hex, named, rgba or hsla. If the color value is omitted, box shadows are drawn in the foreground color (text color). But be aware, older WebKit browsers (pre Chrome 20 and Safari 6) ignore the rule when color is omitted.

Using a semi-transparent color like rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.4) is most common, and a nice effect, as it doesn't completely/opaquely cover what it's over, but allows what's underneath to show through a bit, like a real shadow.

Example

Inner Shadow

.shadow {
   -moz-box-shadow:    inset 0 0 10px #000000;
   -webkit-box-shadow: inset 0 0 10px #000000;
   box-shadow:         inset 0 0 10px #000000;
}

Example

Internet Explorer (8 and down) Box Shadow

You need an extra element, but it's do-able with filter.

<div class="shadow1">
  <div class="content">
    Box-shadowed element
  </div>
</div>
.shadow1 {
  margin: 40px;
  background-color: rgb(68,68,68); /* Needed for IEs */

  -moz-box-shadow: 5px 5px 5px rgba(68,68,68,0.6);
  -webkit-box-shadow: 5px 5px 5px rgba(68,68,68,0.6);
  box-shadow: 5px 5px 5px rgba(68,68,68,0.6);

  filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Blur(PixelRadius=3,MakeShadow=true,ShadowOpacity=0.30);
  -ms-filter: "progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Blur(PixelRadius=3,MakeShadow=true,ShadowOpacity=0.30)";
  zoom: 1;
}
.shadow1 .content {
  position: relative; /* This protects the inner element from being blurred */
  padding: 100px;
  background-color: #DDD;
}

One-Side Only

Using a negative spread radius, you can get squeeze in a box shadow and only push it off one edge of a box.

.one-edge-shadow {
  -webkit-box-shadow: 0 8px 6px -6px black;
     -moz-box-shadow: 0 8px 6px -6px black;
          box-shadow: 0 8px 6px -6px black;
}

Multiple Borders & More

You can comma separate box-shadow any many times as you like. For instance, this shows two shadows with different positions and different colors on the same element:

box-shadow: 
  inset 5px 5px 10px #000000, 
  inset -5px -5px 10px blue;

The example shows how you can use that to create multiple borders:

See the Pen bCqia by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) on CodePen.

By applying the shadows to pseudo elements which you then manipulate, you can get some pretty fancy 3D looking box shadows:

See the Pen CSS3 Box Shadows Effects by Halil İbrahim Nuroğlu (@haibnu) on CodePen.

Relevant Links

Browser Support

See snippet at top of page for specifics on vendor prefix coverage. This is one of those properties where dropping the prefixes is pretty reasonable at this point.

Chrome Safari Firefox Opera IE Android iOS
Any 3+ 3.5+ 10.5+ 9+ 2.3+ 4.0.2+

Comments

  1. Permalink to comment#

    Good to see this, But this is very basic.
    I was looking for something advanced.

    Anyways thanks for this!

  2. Is there anything like outset, to counteract inset value (using LESS mixin and need to fill the variable set for inset).

  3. Hi, first i must say i love you site and it has helped me many times.
    one thing about box shadow i am see is that there is a difference between FF and chrome in terms of the distance.
    what i mean is, when useing this code

       box-shadow: 0 4px 10px -10px; 

    in FF it shows a nice shadow on the bottom of the box, but in chrome it is not showing. in order to show i need to change it to this:

       box-shadow: 0 7px 10px -10px; 

    would love to hear what you say about this.
    Thanks

  4. i like css3 and your site :) but i hate INTERNET EXPLORER :@

  5. Thomas
    Permalink to comment#

    Here is a test page for comparison. View this page in Chrome, IE, then FireFox (current versions).

    http://www.danwenjiang.com/box_shadow_compare.php

    Notice that Chrome and IE (wow!) display it correctly, while FireFox does not render the same way.

    Here is the css:

    td.greybutton {

    background: #696059;

    border-color: #660707 #660707 #5e0f0d;  
    
    box-shadow: inset 0 1px 0 rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.15), inset 1px 0 0 rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.15);
    
    -moz-box-shadow: inset 0 1px 0 rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.15), inset 1px 0 0 rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.15);
    
    border-collapse: separate;
    
    text-shadow: 1px 1px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.3);
    
    padding: 10px 15px 10px 15px;
    
    color: #F5F5F5;
    

    }

    td.greybutton:hover {
    background: #944F1B;

    color: #F5F5F5;
    

    }

    .unselected {
    color:#fff;
    }

    Here is the markup:

    Menu Item 1

    Menu Item 2

    Menu Item 3

    Any ideas on how to get FireFox to play nice?

    BTW – Safari seems fine too, but Opera renders similarly to FireFox.

  6. Skip
    Permalink to comment#

    could you post the code to make Effect 2, I cant figure it out nor understand what you meant by pseudo elements?

    • Skip
      Permalink to comment#

      Ok, so I feel like a dufus lol. found where the html and css was lol. But I tried it and it doesnt do anything? I will play with it for a while maybe I am doing something wrong

  7. Deryn

    Thank you very much for sharing, the effects are very cool.

    In the rule for Effect 7 I don’t really understand how the code works:

    .effect7::after {
        right:10px; /* why reset it if right: 10px was already set above? */
        left:auto; /* why is this necessary, what does it change? */
        transform:skew(8deg) rotate(3deg); /* I'm a bit lost here */
    }

    Why does the subsequent skew and rotate change the shadow the way it does?

  8. Refath
    Permalink to comment#

    @Chris Coyier
    Would you mind leaving a suggestion/compliment on my website @leftree.webs.com? Yes,I have used the Sitebuilder,but I have a pretty well knowledge of HTML5 & CSS3 as can be demonstrated here: http://www.codecademy.com/kerpoof/codebits/NsulFX/edit
    How to:Just click on the green lightbulb on the bottom left corner.Thanks!

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