Props and PropTypes in React

React encourages developers to build by breaking a UI up into components. This means there will always be a need to pass data from one component to another — more specifically, from parent to child component — since we’re stitching them together and they rely on one another.

React calls the data passed between components props and we’re going to look into those in great detail. And, since we’re talking about props, any post on the topic would be incomplete without looking at PropTypes because they ensure that components are passing the right data needed for the job.

With that, let’s unpack these essential but loaded terms together.

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The Ecological Impact of Browser Diversity

Early in my career when I worked at agencies and later at Microsoft on Edge, I heard the same lament over and over: "Argh, why doesn’t Edge just run on Blink? Then I would have access to ALL THE APIs I want to use and would only have to test in one browser!"

Let me be clear: an Internet that runs only on Chrome’s engine, Blink, and its offspring, is not the paradise we like to imagine it to be.

As a Google Developer Expert who has worked on Microsoft Edge, with Firefox, and with the W3C as an Invited Expert, I have some opinions (and a number of facts) to drop on this topic. Let’s get to it.

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​The Ultimate Guide to Headless CMS

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An Intro to Web Site Testing with Cypress

End-to-end testing is awesome because it mirrors the user’s experience. Where you might need a ton of unit tests to get good coverage (the kind where you test that a function returns a value you expect), you can write a single end-to-end test that acts like a real human as it tests several pieces of your app at once. It’s a very economical way of testing your app.

Cypress is a new-ish test runner with some features that take some of the friction out of end-to-end testing. It sports the ability to automatically wait for elements (if you try to grab onto an element it can’t find), wait for Ajax requests, great visibility into your test outcomes, and an easy-to-use API.

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Super-Powered Grid Components with CSS Custom Properties

A little while ago, I wrote a well-received article about combining CSS variables with CSS grid to help build more maintainable layouts. But CSS grid isn’t just for pages! That is a common myth. Although it is certainly very useful for page layout, I find myself just as frequently reaching for grid when it comes to components. In this article I’ll address using CSS grid at the component level.

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​Reinvest Your Time With HelloSign API

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A Tale of Two Buttons

I enjoy front-end developer thought progression articles like this one by James Nash. Say you have a button which needs to work in "normal" conditions (light backgrounds) and one with reverse-colors for going on dark backgrounds. Do you have a modifier class on the button itself? How about on the container? How can inheritance and the cascade help? How about custom properties?

I think embracing CSS’s cascade can be a great way to encourage consistency and simplicity in UIs. Rather than every new component being a free for all, it trains both designers and developers to think in terms of aligning with and re-using what they already have.

A Native Lazy Load for the Web

A new Chrome feature dubbed "Blink LazyLoad" is designed to dramatically improve performance by deferring the load of below-the-fold images and third-party <iframe></iframe>s.

The goals of this bold experiment are to improve the overall render speed of content that appears within a user’s viewport (also known as above-the-fold), as well as, reduce network data and memory usage. ✨

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Using CSS Clip Path to Create Interactive Effects, Part II

This is a follow up to my previous post looking into clip paths. Last time around, we dug into the fundamentals of clipping and how to get started. We looked at some ideas to exemplify what we can do with clipping. We’re going to take things a step further in this post and look at different examples, discuss alternative techniques, and consider how to approach our work to be cross-browser compatible.

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