Articles by
Geoff Graham

Read, write, coffee, web, repeat.

The All-New Guide to CSS Support in Email

Campaign Monitor has completely updated it's guide to CSS support in email. Although there was a four-year gap between updates (and this thing has been around for 10 years!), it's continued to be something I reference often when designing and developing for email.

Calling this an update is underselling the work put into this. According to the post:

The previous guide included 111 different features, whereas the new guide covers a total of 278 features.

Adding reference and testing results for 167 new features is pretty amazing. Even recent features like CSS Grid are included — and, spoiler alert, there is a smidgeon of Grid support out in the wild.

This is an entire redesign of the guide and it's well worth the time to sift through it for anyone who does any amount of email design or development. Of course, testing tools are still super important to the over email workflow, but a guide like this helps for making good design and development decisions up front that should make testing more about... well, testing, rather than discovering what is possible.

6 Months of Working Remotely Taught Me a Thing or Ten

Peter Anglea writes up his key takeaways after six months on the job with a new front-end position. His points ring true to me as a remote worker and the funny thing is that each one of the suggestions is actually applicable to anyone in almost any front-end job, whether it happens to be in-house or remote.

(more…)

The average web page is 3MB. How much should we care?

Tammy Everts with a deep dive into the average page size, which seems to grow year in and year out.

It's a little perplexing that the average page size trends up each year as performance has become a growing concern on the forefront of our minds, but Tammy has keen insights that are worth reading because she suggests that user experience isn't always about page size and that bloat is far from the only metric we should be concerned.

(more…)

Screen Readers and CSS: Are We Going Out of Style (and into Content)?

The big takeaway in this post is that screen readers do not always read content the way it is styled in CSS. Toss in the fact that not all screen readers speak or read markup the same way and that there are differences in how they render content in different browsers and the results become...well different. Kind of like cross-browser testing CSS, but with speech.

(more…)

Upgrade Your JavaScript Error Monitoring

Automatically detect and diagnose JavaScript errors impacting your users with Bugsnag. Get comprehensive diagnostic reports, know immediately which errors are worth fixing, and debug in a fraction of the time compared to traditional tools.

(more…)

For the love of God, please tell me what your company does

Kasper Kubica goes on a humorous rant about the way companies describe themselves on their websites:

More and more often, upon discovering a new company or product, I visit their website hoping to find out what it is they do, but instead get fed a mash of buzzwords about their “team” and “values”. And this isn’t a side dish — this is the main entrée of these sites, with a coherent explanation of the company’s products or services rarely occupying more than a footnote on the menu.

(more…)

Breaking the Grid

If you thought CSS Grid solves issues where overflowed content escaping the confines of a horizontal layout, then think again. Dave Rupert writes up two ways he unintentionally broke outside the grid and how he wrangled things back into place.

(more…)

icon-anchoricon-closeicon-emailicon-linkicon-logo-staricon-menuicon-nav-guideicon-searchicon-staricon-tag