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Five 5-minute Videos from Ethan on Design & Accessibility

Ethan:

I’ve been working with Aquent Gymnasium to produce a series of five short tutorial videos, which have been launching over the course of this past week. Since the last video just went live, I’m thrilled to share the whole list with you:

Introduction to using VoiceOver on macOS
Designing beautiful focus states
Flexible and accessible typesetting
Responsively designing with viewport units
Designing beautiful and accessible drop caps

Five minutes is a real sweet … Read article “Five 5-minute Videos from Ethan on Design & Accessibility”

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Quick Tips for High Contrast Mode

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Striking a Balance Between Native and Custom Select Elements

Here’s the plan! We’re going to build a styled select element. Not just the outside, but the inside too. Total styling control. Plus we’re going to make it accessible. We’re not going to try to replicate everything that the browser does by default with a native <select> element. We’re going to literally use a <select> element when any assistive tech is used. But when a mouse is being used, we’ll show the styled version and make it function as … Read article “Striking a Balance Between Native and Custom Select Elements”

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Block Links: The Search for a Perfect Solution

I was reading this article by Chris where he talks about block links — you know, like wrapping an entire card element inside an anchor — being a bad idea. It’s bad accessibility because of how it affects screen readers. And it’s bad UX because it prevents simple user tasks, like selecting text.

But maybe there’s something else at play. Maybe it’s less an issue with the pattern than the implementation of it. That led me to believe that this … Read article “Block Links: The Search for a Perfect Solution”

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Creating an Accessible Range Slider with CSS

The accessibility trick is using <input type="range"> and wrestling it into shape with CSS rather than giving up and re-building it with divs or whatever and later forget about accessibility.

The most clever example uses an angled linear-gradient background making the input look like a volume slider where left = low and right = high.… Read article “Creating an Accessible Range Slider with CSS”

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The Anatomy of a Tablist Component in Vanilla JavaScript Versus React

If you follow the undercurrent of the JavaScript community, there seems to be a divide as of late. It goes back over a decade. Really, this sort of strife has always been. Perhaps it is human nature.

Whenever a popular framework gains traction, you inevitably see people comparing it to rivals. I suppose that is to be expected. Everyone has a particular favorite.

Lately, the framework everyone loves (to hate?) is React. You often see it pitted against others … Read article “The Anatomy of a Tablist Component in Vanilla JavaScript Versus React”

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Accessible Font Sizing, Explained

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG), an organization that defines standards for web content accessibility, does not specify a minimum font size for the web.

But we know there’s such a thing as text that is too small to be legible, just as text that can be too large to consume. So, how can we make sure our font sizes are accessible? What sort of best practices can we rely on to make for an accessible reading experience?

The answer: … Read article “Accessible Font Sizing, Explained”

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The Contrast Triangle

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The WebAIM Million—Updated

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Accessibility Links

Austin Gil has kicked off the first in a five-part series about “HTML Forms Right” and to starts with semantics. It’s talking to the “we build our front-ends with JavaScript” crowd. The first block of code is an example of an Ajax form submission where the data submitted is gathered through the JavaScript API FormData.… Read article “Accessibility Links”