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Ease-y Breezy: A Primer on Easing Functions

During the past few months, I’ve been actively teaching myself how to draw and animate SVG shapes. I’ve been using CSS transitions, as well as tools like D3.js, react-motion and GSAP, to create my animations.

One thing about animations in general and the documentation these and other animation tools recommend is using easing functions. I’ve been working with them in some capacity over the years, but to be honest, I would never know which function to choose … Read article

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Reversing an Easing Curve

Let’s take a look at a carousel I worked on where items slide in and out of view with CSS animations. To get each item to slide in and out of view nicely I used a cubic-bezier for the animation-timing-function property, instead of using a standard easing keyword.… Read article

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ease-out, in; ease-in, out

We got to talking about easing in a recent episode of ShopTalk with Val Head and Sarah Drasner. Easing is important stuff when it comes to animations and transitions. Combined with the duration, it has a huge effect on the feel of change. If you're taking animation seriously as part of the brand on a project, you should define and consistently use easings.

That said, it's a balance between:

  • Crafting/using easings that match your brand
  • Adhering to soft "rules" about
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