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Keyboard-Only Focus Styles

Like Eric Bailey says, if it's interactive, it needs a focus style. Perhaps your best bet? Don't remove the dang outlines that focusable elements have by default. If you're going to rock a button { outline: 0; }, for example, then you'd better do a button:focus { /* something else very obvious visually */ }. I handled a ticket just today where a missing focus style was harming a user who relies on visual focus styles to … Read article

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`:focus-visible` and backwards compatibility

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Keeping Parent Visible While Child in :focus

Say we have a <div></div>.

We only want this div to be visible when it's hovered, so:

div:hover { 
  opacity: 1; 
}

We need focus styles as well, for accessibility, so:

div:hover,
div:focus { 
  opacity: 1; 
}

But div's can't be focused on their own, so we'll need:

<div tabindex="0">
</div>

There is content in this div. Not just text, but links as well.

<div tabindex="0">
  <p>This little piggy went to market.</p>
  <a href="#market">Go to market</a>
</div>

This is … Read article

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Removing that ugly :focus ring (and keeping it too)

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Focus Styles on Non-Interactive Elements?

Last month, Heather Migliorisi looked at the accessibility of Smooth Scrolling. In order to do smooth scrolling, you:

  1. Check if the clicked link is #jump link
  2. Stop the browser default behavior of jumping immediately to that element on the page
  3. Animate the scrolling to the element the #jump link pointed to

Stopping the browser default behavior is the part that is problematic for accessibility. No longer does the #jump link move focus to element the #jump link pointed to. … Read article

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