DevTools

DevTools for Designers

This is such an interesting conversation thread that keeps popping up year after year. The idea is that there could (and perhaps should) be in-browser tooling that helps web designers do their job. This tooling already exists to some degree. Let's check in on perspectives from a wide array of people and companies who have shared thoughts on this topic.

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How to stop using console.log() and start using your browser’s debugger

Whenever I see someone really effectively debug JavaScript in the browser, they use the DevTools tooling to do it. Setting breakpoints and hopping over them and such. That, as opposed to sprinkling console.log() (and friends) statements all around your code.

Parag Zaveri wrote about the transition and it has clearly resonated with lots of folks! (7.5k claps on Medium as I write).

I know I have hangups about it...

  • Part of debugging is not just inspecting code once as-is; it's inspecting stuff, making changes and then continuing to debug. If I spend a bunch of time setting up breakpoints, will they still be there after I've changed my code and refreshed? Answer: DevTools appears to do a pretty good job with that.
  • Looking at the console to see some output is one thing, but mucking about in the Sources panel is another. My code there might be transpiled, combined, and not quite look like my authored code, making things harder to find. Plus it's a bit cramped in there, visually.

But yet! It's so powerful. Setting a breakpoint (just by clicking a line number) means that I don't have to litter my own code with extra junk, nor do I have to choose what to log. Every variable in local and global scope is available for me to look at that breakpoint. I learned in Parag's article that you might not even need to manually set breakpoints. You can, for example, have it break whenever a click (or other) event fires. Plus, you can type in variable names you specifically want to watch for, so you don't have to dig around looking for them. I'll be trying to use the proper DevTools for debugging more often and seeing how it goes.

While we're talking about debugging though... I've had this in my head for a few months: Why doesn't JavaScript have log levels? Apparently, this is a very common concept in many other languages. You can write logging statements, but they will only log if the configuration says it should. That way, in development, you can get detailed logging, but log only more serious errors in production. I mention it because it could be nice to leave useful logging statements in the code, but not have them actually log if you set like console.level = "production"; or whatever. Or perhaps they could be compiled out during a build step.

Quick Tip: Debug iOS Safari on a true local emulator (or your actual iPhone/iPad)

We've been able to do this for years, largely for free (ignoring the costs of the computer and devices), but I'm not sure as many people know about it as they should.

TL;DR: XCode comes with a "Simulator" program you can pop open to test in virtual iOS devices. If you then open Safari's Develop/Debug menu, you can use its DevTools to inspect right there — also true if you plug in your real iOS device.

What do we call browser’s native development tools?

You know, that panel of tools that allows you to do stuff like inspect the DOM and see network requests. How do the companies that make them refer to them?

I think it's somewhat safe to generically refer to them as DevTools. Safari is the only browser that doesn't use that term, but I imagine even die-hard Safari users will know what you mean.

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Inspecting Animations in DevTools

I stumbled upon the Animation panel in Chrome’s DevTools the other day and almost jumped out of my seat with pure joy. Not only was I completely unaware that such a thing exists, but it was better than what I could’ve hoped: it lets you control and manipulate CSS animations and visualize how everything works under the hood.

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Chrome DevTools “Local Overrides”

There's been two really interesting videos released recently that use the "Local Overrides" feature of Chrome DevTools in order to play with web performance without even touching the original source code.

The big idea is that you can literally edit CSS and reload the page and your changes stick. Meaning you can use the other performance testing tools inside DevTools to see if your changes had the effect you wanted them to have. Great for showing a client a change without them having to set up a whole dev environment for you.

Monitoring unused CSS by unleashing the raw power of the DevTools Protocol

From Johnny's dev blog:

The challenge: Calculate the real percentage of unused CSS

Our goal is to create a script that will measure the percentage of unused CSS of this page. Notice that the user can interact with the page and navigate using the different tabs.

DevTools can be used to measure the amount of unused CSS in the page using the Coverage tab. Notice that the percentage of unused CSS after the page loads is ~55%, but after clicking on each of the tabs, more CSS rules are applied and the percentage drops down to just ~15%.

That's why I'm so skeptical of anything that attempts to measure "unused CSS." This is an incredibly simple demo (all it does is click some tabs) and the amount of unused CSS changes dramatically.

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