SVG

How to create a logo that responds to its own aspect ratio

One of the cool things about <svg> is that it's literally its own document, so @media queries in CSS inside the SVG are based on its viewport rather than the HTML document that likely contains it.

This unique feature has let people play around for years. Tim Kadlec experimented with SVG formats and which ones respect the media queries most reliably. Sara Soueidan experimented with that a bunch more. Jake Archibald embedded a canvas inside and tested cross-browser compatibility that way. Estelle Weyl used that ability to do responsive images before responsive images.

Another thing that has really tripped people's triggers is using that local media query stuff to make responsive logos. Most famously Joe Harrison's site, but Tyler Sticka, Jeremy Frank, and Chris Austin all had a go as well.

Nils Binder has the latest take. Nils take is especially clever in how it uses <symbol>s referencing other <symbol>s for extra efficiency and min-aspect-ratio media queries rather than magic number widths.

For the record, we still very much need container queries for HTML elements. I get that it's hard, but the difficulty of implementation and usefulness are different things. I much prefer interesting modern solutions over trying to be talked out of it.

Animate Calligraphy with SVG

From time to time at Stackoverflow, the question pops up whether there is an equivalent to the stroke-dashoffset technique for animating the SVG stroke that works for the fill attribute. But upon closer inspection, what the questions are really trying to ask is something like this:

I have something that is sort of a line, but because it has varying brush widths, in SVG it is defined as the fill of a path.

How can this "brush" be animated?

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Animated SVG Radial Progress Bars

Dave Rupert shows us all how to animate radial progress bars in SVG with a tiny script alongside the stroke-dasharray and stroke-dashoffset properties:

For a client project we tasked ourselves with building out one of those cool radial progress bars. In the past, we’ve used entire Canvas-based charting libraries (156k/44k gzip), but that seemed like overkill. I looked at Airbnb’s Lottie project where you export After Effects animations as JSON. This is cool for complex animations, but the dependencies seemed heavy (248k/56k gzip) for one micro-animation.

Per the usual, I tried my hand at a minimal custom SVG with CSS animation and a small bit of JavaScript (~223b gzip). I’m pleased with the results.

Here's another example Jeremias Menichelli posted here on CSS-Tricks with the added twist of making them components in React and Vue.

Scooped Corners in 2018

When I saw Chris' article on notched boxes, I remembered that I got a challenge a while ago to CSS a design like it, but with rounded, scooped corners instead. So, let's see how we can do it that way instead and expand it to multiple corners while being mindful of browser support.

CSS Techniques and Effects for Knockout Text

Knockout text is a technique where words are clipped out of an element and reveal the background. In other words, you only see the background because the letters are knocking out holes. It’s appealing because it opens up typographic styles that we don’t get out of traditional CSS properties, like color.

While we’ve seen a number of ways to accomplish knockout text in the past, there are some modern CSS properties we can use now and even enhance the effect further, like transitions and animations. Let’s see them in action.

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