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When Sass and New CSS Features Collide

Recently, CSS has added a lot of new cool features such as custom properties and new functions. While these things can make our lives a lot easier, they can also end up interacting with preprocessors, like Sass, in funny ways.

So this is going to be a post about the issues I’ve encountered, how I go around them, and why I still find Sass necessary these days.… Read article “When Sass and New CSS Features Collide”

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Making My Netlify Build Run Sass

Let’s say you wanted to build a site with Eleventy as the generator. Popular choice these days! Eleventy doesn’t have some particularly blessed way of preprocessing your CSS, if that’s something you want to do. There are a variety of ways to do it and perhaps that freedom is part of the spirit of Eleventy.

I’ve seen people set up Gulp for this, which is cool, I still use and like Gulp for some stuff. I’ve seen someone use templatingRead article “Making My Netlify Build Run Sass”

Article

How to Tame Line Height in CSS

In CSS, line-height is probably one of the most misunderstood, yet commonly-used attributes. As designers and developers, when we think about line-height, we might think about the concept of leading from print design — a term, interestingly enough, that comes from literally putting pieces of lead between lines of type. 

Leading and line-height, however similar, have some important differences. To understand those differences, we first have to understand a bit more about typography. … Read article “How to Tame Line Height in CSS”

Article

Getting JavaScript to Talk to CSS and Sass

JavaScript and CSS have lived beside one another for upwards of 20 years. And yet it’s been remarkably tough to share data between them. There have been large attempts, sure. But, I have something simple and intuitive in mind — something not involving a structural change, but rather putting CSS custom properties and even Sass variables to use.… Read article “Getting JavaScript to Talk to CSS and Sass”

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Sass !default and themeable design systems

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A Handy Sass-Powered Tool for Making Balanced Color Palettes

For those who may not come from a design background, selecting a color palette is often based on personal preferences. Choosing colors might be done with an online color tool, sampling from an image, “borrowing” from favorite brands, or just sort of randomly picking from a color wheel until a palette “just feels right.”

Our goal is to better understand what makes a palette “feel right” by exploring key color attributes with Sass color functions. By the end, you will … Read article “A Handy Sass-Powered Tool for Making Balanced Color Palettes”

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Introducing Sass Modules

Sass just launched a major new feature you might recognize from other languages: a module system. This is a big step forward for @import. one of the most-used Sass-features. While the current @import rule allows you to pull in third-party packages, and split your Sass into manageable “partials,” it has a few limitations:

  • @import is also a CSS feature, and the differences can be confusing
  • If you @import the same file multiple times, it can slow down compilation,
Read article “Introducing Sass Modules”
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A Proof of Concept for Making Sass Faster

At the start of a new project, Sass compilation happens in the blink of an eye. This feels great, especially when it’s paired with Browsersync, which reloads the stylesheet for us in the browser. But, as the amount of Sass grows, compilation time increases. This is far from ideal.

It can be a real pain when the compilation time creeps over one or two seconds. For me, that’s enough time to lose focus at the end of a long day. … Read article “A Proof of Concept for Making Sass Faster”

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Creating a Maintainable Icon System with Sass

One of my favorite ways of adding icons to a site is by including them as data URL background images to pseudo-elements (e.g. ::after) in my CSS. This technique offers several advantages:

  • They don’t require any additional HTTP requests other than the CSS file.
  • Using the background-size property, you can set your pseudo-element to any size you need without worrying that they will overflow the boundaries (or get chopped off).
  • They are ignored by screen readers (at least in
Read article “Creating a Maintainable Icon System with Sass”
Article

Staggered CSS Transitions

Let’s say you wanted to move an element on :hover for a fun visual effect.

@media (hover: hover) {
  .list--item {
    transition: 0.1s;
    transform: translateY(10px);
  }
  .list--item:hover,
  .list--item:focus {
    transform: translateY(0);
  }
}

Cool cool. But what if you had several list items, and you wanted them all to move on hover, but each one offset with staggered timing?… Read article “Staggered CSS Transitions”