Sass

Inverse trigonometric functions with Sass

I link this up not because I think we all need to know trigonometry in our day to day CSS worker lives, but because: holy crap Ana Tudor does amazing stuff with Math and Sass which results in some capital-A Art and I'm sure there are more of you out there that would be interested in following her work.

Introducing Scut, a new Sass utility library

The following is a guest post by David Clark. I think David's new Sass library "Scut" is pretty interesting. It's like a design utility library, which is distinct from a design pattern library in that it enforces no particular structure or particular visual design. I've always found this kind of thing fascinating, largely because I've never been able to pull it off in a way that feels good to me. I always end up leaning too far into visual design, or too abstract to the point of it not being all that useful. I think David just might be on the right track here. I'll let him explain in detail.

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Conditional Media Query Mixins

Using a @mixin in Sass for your media queries is useful for a variety of reasons. The most important of which is probably the cognitive ease of having the properties and values you are changing right next to the originals. But another reason is that you then gain the ability to "shut off" those media queries if you need to, and there are some perfectly valid reasons to want to do that.

Animating DOM transitions

Say you add some new element to the page and it pushes things around. That can happen instantly, but it helps your brain understand what just happened if the elements that were pushed away animate to their new position. Enter Alex MacCaw and his new magicMove jQuery plugin:

The library works by appending a separate and hidden clone of the element you’re transitioning to the page. Any DOM manipulation you do is actually manipulating that clone. Then, when you’re finished, the library looks at the difference between the element’s current position, and the clone’s position, and animates between them (using CSS transitions).

Don’t Overthink It Grids

The vast majority of websites out there use a grid. They may not explicitly have a grid system in place, but if they have a "main content area" floated to the left a "sidebar" floated to the right, it's a simple grid.

If a more complex layout presents itself, people often reach for a grid framework. They assume grids are these super difficult things best left to super CSS nerds. That idea is perpetuated by the fact that a lot of the grid systems they reach for are very complicated.

Here's how I build grids. It's not hard or complicated. Even making them flexible is no big deal.

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