JavaScript

You might not need a loop

Ire Aderinokun has written a nifty piece using loops and when we might consider replacing it with another method, say .map() and .filter(). I particularly like what she has to say here:

As I mentioned earlier, loops are a great tool for a lot of cases, and the existence of these new methods doesn't mean that loops shouldn't be used at all.

I think these methods are great because they provide code that is in a way self-documenting. When we use the filter() method instead of a for loop, it is easier to understand at first glance what the purpose of the logic is.

However, these methods have very specific use cases and may be overkill if their full value isn't being used. An example of this is the map() method, which can technically be used to replace almost any arbitrary loop. If in our first example, we only wanted to modify the original articles array and not create a new, modified, amazingArticles, using this method would be unnecessary. It's important to use the method that suits each scenario, to make sure that we aren't over- or under-performing.

If you’re interested in digging more into this subject, Adan Giese wrote a great post about the .filter() method a short while ago that’s definitely worth checking out. Oh, and speaking of lots of different ways to approach loops, Chris compiled a list of options for looping over querySelectorAll NodeLists where forEach is just one of many options.

A Bunch of Options for Looping Over querySelectorAll NodeLists

A common need when writing vanilla JavaScript is to find a selection of elements in the DOM and loop over them. For example, finding instances of a button and attaching a click handler to them.

const buttons = document.querySelectorAll(".js-do-thing");
// There could be any number of these! 
// I need to loop over them and attach a click handler.

There are SO MANY ways to go about it. Let's go through them.

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Demystifying JavaScript Testing

Many people have messaged me, confused about where to get started with testing. Just like everything else in software, we work hard to build abstractions to make our jobs easier. But that amount of abstraction evolves over time, until the only ones who really understand it are the ones who built the abstraction in the first place. Everyone else is left with taking the terms, APIs, and tools at face value and struggling to make things work.

One thing I believe about abstraction in code is that the abstraction is not magic — it’s code. Another I thing I believe about abstraction in code is that it’s easier to learn by doing.

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How to stop using console.log() and start using your browser’s debugger

Whenever I see someone really effectively debug JavaScript in the browser, they use the DevTools tooling to do it. Setting breakpoints and hopping over them and such. That, as opposed to sprinkling console.log() (and friends) statements all around your code.

Parag Zaveri wrote about the transition and it has clearly resonated with lots of folks! (7.5k claps on Medium as I write).

I know I have hangups about it...

  • Part of debugging is not just inspecting code once as-is; it's inspecting stuff, making changes and then continuing to debug. If I spend a bunch of time setting up breakpoints, will they still be there after I've changed my code and refreshed? Answer: DevTools appears to do a pretty good job with that.
  • Looking at the console to see some output is one thing, but mucking about in the Sources panel is another. My code there might be transpiled, combined, and not quite look like my authored code, making things harder to find. Plus it's a bit cramped in there, visually.

But yet! It's so powerful. Setting a breakpoint (just by clicking a line number) means that I don't have to litter my own code with extra junk, nor do I have to choose what to log. Every variable in local and global scope is available for me to look at that breakpoint. I learned in Parag's article that you might not even need to manually set breakpoints. You can, for example, have it break whenever a click (or other) event fires. Plus, you can type in variable names you specifically want to watch for, so you don't have to dig around looking for them. I'll be trying to use the proper DevTools for debugging more often and seeing how it goes.

While we're talking about debugging though... I've had this in my head for a few months: Why doesn't JavaScript have log levels? Apparently, this is a very common concept in many other languages. You can write logging statements, but they will only log if the configuration says it should. That way, in development, you can get detailed logging, but log only more serious errors in production. I mention it because it could be nice to leave useful logging statements in the code, but not have them actually log if you set like console.level = "production"; or whatever. Or perhaps they could be compiled out during a build step.

#165: Building Your Backend with Serverless Functions

David Wells & Chris Coyier talk about how you can build an app hosted on Netlify statically but still have a backend database to power it. We use the classic TODO app example where the database is powered by FaunaDB and we talk to that database via serverless functions (i.e. Node.js JavaScript functions running on AWS Lambda via Netlify's extremely easy and powerful integration). Put the JavaScript files in a /functions folder and they'll be deployed and runnable!

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Why Using reduce() to Sequentially Resolve Promises Works

Writing asynchronous JavaScript without using the Promise object is a lot like baking a cake with your eyes closed. It can be done, but it's gonna be messy and you'll probably end up burning yourself.

I won't say it's necessary, but you get the idea. It's real nice. Sometimes, though, it needs a little help to solve some unique challenges, like when you're trying to sequentially resolve a bunch of promises in order, one after the other. A trick like this is handy, for example, when you're doing some sort of batch processing via AJAX. You want the server to process a bunch of things, but not all at once, so you space the processing out over time.

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Moving Backgrounds With Mouse Position

Let's say you wanted to move the background-position on an element as you mouse over it to give the design a little pizzazz. You have an element like this:

<div class="module" id="module"></div>

And you toss a background on it:

.module {
  background-image: url(big-image.jpg);
}

You can adjust the background-position in JavaScript like this:

const el = document.querySelector("#module");

el.addEventListener("mousemove", (e) => {
  el.style.backgroundPositionX = -e.offsetX + "px";
  el.style.backgroundPositionY = -e.offsetY + "px";
});

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New mobile Chrome feature would disable scripts on slow connections

This is a possible upcoming feature for mobile Chrome:

If a Data Saver user is on a 2G-speed or slower network according to the NetInfo API, Chrome disables scripts and sends an intervention header on every resource request. Users are shown a UI at the bottom of the screen indicating the page has been modified to save data. Users can enable scripts on the page by tapping “Show original” in the UI.

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Level up your .filter game

.filter is a built-in array iteration method that accepts a predicate which is called against each of its values, and returns a subset of all values that return a truthy value.

That is a lot to unpack in one statement! Let's take a look at that statement piece-by-piece.

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The Cost of JavaScript in 2018

Even though we mentioned it earlier, I thought this outstanding post by Addy Osmani all about the performance concerns of JavaScript was still worth digging into a little more.

In that post, Addy touches on all aspects of perf work and how we can fix some of the most egregious issues, from setting up a budget to “Time-to-Interactive” measurements and auditing your JavaScript bundles.

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