CSS is fun and cool and I like it.
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The Complete CSS Demo for OpenType Features

I'm very glad a guide for these features exists because we already know there are so many weird things that variable fonts can do — well done, Tunghsiao Liu!

There are quite a few possible values for font-feature-settings, like, ya know:

aalt, swsh, cswh, calt, hist, hlig, locl, rand, nalt, cv01-cv99, salt, subs, sups, titl, rvrn, liga, dlig, size, ornm, … Read article

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Chris Coyier
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Your Body Text is Too Small

Several years ago, there was a big push by designers to increase the font-size of websites and I feel like we’re living in another era of accessibility improvements where a fresh batch of designers are pushing for even larger text sizing today. Take this post by Christian Miller, for example, where he writes:

The majority of websites are still anywhere in the range of 15–18px. We’re starting to see some sites adopt larger body text at around 20px or even

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Robin Rendle
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Font Playground

This is a wondrous little project by Wenting Zhang that showcases a series of variable fonts and lets you manipulate their settings to see the results. It’s interesting that there’s so many tools like this that have been released over the past couple of months, such as v-fonts, Axis-Praxis and Wakamai Fondue just to name a few.… Read article

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Robin Rendle
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Don’t just copy the @font-face out of Google Fonts URLs

I don't think this is an epidemic or anything, but I've seen it done a few times and even advocated for. This is what I mean...… Read article

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Just a Couple’a Fun Typography Links

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It All Started With Emoji: Color Typography on the Web

“Typography on the web is in single color: characters are either black or red, never black and red …Then emoji hit the scene, became part of Unicode, and therefore could be expressed by characters — or “glyphs” in font terminology. The smiley, levitating businessman and the infamous pile of poo became true siblings to letters, numbers and punctuation marks.”

Roel Nieskens

Using emojis in code is easy. Head over to emojipedia and copy and paste one in.… Read article

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Wakamai Fondue

Roel Nieskens released a tool that lets you upload a font file and see what’s inside, from how many characters it contains to the number of languages it supports. Here’s what you see once you upload a font, in this case Covik Sans Mono Black:

Why is this data useful? Well, I used this tool just the other day when I found a font file in a random Dropbox folder. What OpenType features does this font have? Are there any … Read article

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Robin Rendle
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CSS Techniques and Effects for Knockout Text

Knockout text is a technique where words are clipped out of an element and reveal the background. In other words, you only see the background because the letters are knocking out holes. It’s appealing because it opens up typographic styles that we don’t get out of traditional CSS properties, like color.

While we’ve seen a number of ways to accomplish knockout text in the past, there are some modern CSS properties we can use now and even enhance the … Read article

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One File, Many Options: Using Variable Fonts on the Web

In 2016, an important development in web typography was jointly announced by representatives from Adobe, Microsoft, Apple, and Google. Version 1.8 of the OpenType font format introduced variable fonts. With so many big names involved, it's unsurprising that all browsers are on-board and racing ahead with implementation.… Read article

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An Introduction to the `fr` CSS unit

With all the excitement around CSS Grid, I haven't seen as much talk about the new fr CSS length unit (here's the spec). And now that browser support is rapidly improving for this feature, I think this is the time to explore how it can be used in conjunction with our fancy new layout engine because there are a number of benefits when using it; more legible and maintainable code being the primary reasons for making the switch.… Read article

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The Equilateral Triangle of a Perfect Paragraph

Still, too many web designers neglect the importance of typography on the web. So far, I've only met a few that really understand typography and know how to apply that knowledge to their work. And the lack of knowledge about typography doesn't come from ignorance. I learned that web designers are commonly either self-taught and haven't grasped the importance of typography yet, or they actually studied design but typography was just one of the classes they had to attend.

I … Read article

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Tracing the History of CSS Fonts

Chen Hui Jing has written an excellent post on the history of CSS fonts and the way that the W3C writes the specification and strange CSS properties like font-effect, font-emphasize and font-presentation.

As part of my perpetual obsession with typography, as well as CSS, I've been looking into how we got to having more web fonts than we can shake a stick at. What I love about how the W3C does things is that there are always links

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Robin Rendle
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Combining Fonts

Another one from Jake Archibald!

This one is using two @font-face sets for the same font-family name. The second overrides the first, but only select characters of it, thanks to unicode-range.

You know how designers love ampersands? It's a thing. Dan Cederholm once pointed out some advice from Robert Bringhurst:

Since the ampersand is more often used in display work than in ordinary text, the more creative versions are often the more useful. There is rarely any reason not

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Chris Coyier
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Deep dive CSS: font metrics, line-height and vertical-align

Vincent De Oliveira has written an epic post that details pretty much everything you might ever want to know about the line-height and vertical-align properties. If you’ve ever had trouble aligning things next to text or wondered why two fonts look so wildly different from one another then this post is certainly for you.… Read article

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Robin Rendle
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Design Your Content Typography First (and a Look at Type Nugget)

How often have you seen a "completed" site that still has lorem ipsum text lurking in the quiet corners? While we often strive for perfection in our designs and code, I am reminded every time I stumble across a garbled bit of lorem ipsum that not all aspects of web development process are given the attention they deserve.

Developing a complete and detailed suite of typographic elements is an often-overlooked aspect of the process. While not always as prominent or … Read article

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Has the Internet Killed Curly Quotes?

Glenn Fleishman:

At an increasing number of publications, [curly quotes have] been ironed straight. This may stem from a lack of awareness on the part of website designers or from the difficulty in a content-management system (CMS) getting the curl direction correct every time. It may also be that curly quotes' time has come and gone.

I know it's highly uncool in this community to get quotes wrong and highly cool to remind people how to type them. I'm on … Read article

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Chris Coyier
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That Fluid Type Stuff Again

There have been a couple of articles lately regarding fluid type.

Matt Smith (calling it "flexible type"):

My preferred approach for more flexible type is to calculate the font size based on the viewport height and width using the :root selector

Richard Rutter (calling it "Responsive Display Text"):

In one fell swoop you can set the size of a display heading to be proportional to the screen or browser width, rather than choosing from a scale in a series of

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Methods for Controlling Spacing in Web Typography

If you were developing sites in 2006, then you may have worked with a designer like me who was all up in your business about fonts not looking exactly the same in the browser as they did in mockups.

Then you may have tried explaining to me the pains of cross-browser compatibility and how different browsers render fonts differently from one another. In response, I likely would have sent you an image file that contains the content instead to make … Read article

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System Fonts in SVG

There was a time when the smart move in picking fonts for a website was to a font-family that was supported across as many platforms as possible. font-family: Tahoma; and whatnot. Or even better, a font stack that would fall back to as-similar-as possible stuff, like font-family: Tahoma, Verdana, Segoe, sans-serif;.

These days, an astonishing number of sites are using custom fonts. 60%!

No surprise, there is also a decent amount of pushback on custom fonts. They need to … Read article

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