edge

Edge’s Announcements

The public-consumption blog post:

Ultimately, we want to make the web experience better for many different audiences. People using Microsoft Edge (and potentially other browsers) will experience improved compatibility with all web sites, while getting the best-possible battery life and hardware integration on all kinds of Windows devices. Web developers will have a less-fragmented web platform to test their sites against, ensuring that there are fewer problems and increased satisfaction for users of their sites; and because we’ll continue to provide the Microsoft Edge service-driven understanding of legacy IE-only sites, Corporate IT will have improved compatibility for both old and new web apps in the browser that comes with Windows.

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Sayonara Edge

Sounds like Edge is going to spin down EdgeHTML, the engine that powers edge, and go with Chromium. It's not entirely clear as I write whether the browser will still be called Edge or not. Opera did this same thing in 2013. We'll surely be seeing much more information about this directly from Microsoft, and hot takes galore.

Probably three major categories of hot-take:

  1. Hallelujah, I dislike supporting Edge, this will make my job easier and make the web better for users.
  2. Yikes, this is bad for the web. Browser engine diversity is a very good thing for the web. See Rachel Nabors The Ecological Impact of Browser Diversity.
  3. This might be good in that combining forces makes a stronger team. If many teams each build a 50-meter tower, maybe working together they can build a 100-meter tower.

I'm not quite sure what to think yet, except that it's a good reminder that businesses will be businesses.

The Ecological Impact of Browser Diversity

Early in my career when I worked at agencies and later at Microsoft on Edge, I heard the same lament over and over: "Argh, why doesn’t Edge just run on Blink? Then I would have access to ALL THE APIs I want to use and would only have to test in one browser!"

Let me be clear: an Internet that runs only on Chrome’s engine, Blink, and its offspring, is not the paradise we like to imagine it to be.

As a Google Developer Expert who has worked on Microsoft Edge, with Firefox, and with the W3C as an Invited Expert, I have some opinions (and a number of facts) to drop on this topic. Let’s get to it.

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