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Thinking About Power Usage and Websites

Gerry McGovern asked if I had any insight into energy consumption and websites. He has a book, after all, about the digital costs on the planet. He was wondering about the specifics of web tech, like…

If you do this in HTML it will consume 3× energy but if you do it in JavaScript it will consume 10×.

I would think if you really looked, and knew exactly how to measure it, you could find examples like … Read article “Thinking About Power Usage and Websites”

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Optimizing CSS for faster page loads

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content-visibility: the new CSS property that boosts your rendering performance

Una Kravets and Vladimir Levin:

[…] you can use another CSS property called content-visibility to apply the needed containment automatically. content-visibility ensures that you get the largest performance gains the browser can provide with minimal effort from you as a developer.

The content-visibility property accepts several values, but auto is the one that provides immediate performance improvements.

The perf benefits seems pretty big:

In our example, we see a boost from a 232ms rendering time to a 30ms rendering

Read article “content-visibility: the new CSS property that boosts your rendering performance”
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radEventListener: a Tale of Client-side Framework Performance

React is popular, popular enough that it receives its fair share of criticism. Yet, this criticism of React isn’t completely unwarranted: React and ReactDOM total about 120 KiB of minified JavaScript, which definitely contributes to slow startup time. When client-side rendering in React is relied upon entirely, it churns. Even if you render components on the server and hydrate them on the client, it still churns because component hydration is computationally expensive.… Read article “radEventListener: a Tale of Client-side Framework Performance”

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Make Jamstack Slow? Challenge Accepted.

“Jamstack is slowwwww.” That’s not something you hear often, right? Especially, when one of the main selling points of Jamstack is performance. But yeah, it’s true that even a Jamstack site can suffer hits to performance just like any other site. 

Don’t think that by choosing Jamstack you no longer have to think about performance. Jamstack can be fast — really fast — but you have to make the right choices. Let’s see if we can spot some of the … Read article “Make Jamstack Slow? Challenge Accepted.”

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We need more inclusive web performance metrics

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Some Performance Links

Just had a couple of good performance links burning a hole in my pocket, so blogging them like a good little blogger.… Read article “Some Performance Links”

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The Analytics That Matter

I’ve long been skeptical of quoting global browser usage percentages to justify their usage of browser features. It doesn’t matter what global usage of a browser is, other than nerdy cocktail party fodder. The usage that matters is what users on your site are using, and that can be wildly different from site to site.

That idea of tracking real usage of your actual site concept has bounced around my head the last few days. And it’s not just “I Read article “The Analytics That Matter”

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Analyzing Notion app performance

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How I Used Brotli to Get Even Smaller CSS and JavaScript Files at CDN Scale

This article is about my experience using Brotli at production scale. Despite being really expensive and a truly unfeasible method for on-the-fly compression, Brotli is actually very economical and saves cost on many fronts, especially when compared with gzip or lower compression levels of Brotli.