Grid to Flex

Una Kravets shows how to make layouts in CSS Grid with flexbox fallbacks for browsers that don’t support those grid properties just yet. Una writes:

CSS grid is AMAZING! However, if you need to support users of IE11 and below, or Edge 15 and below, grid won't really work as you expect...This site is a solution for you so you can start to progressively enhance without fear!

The site is a provides examples using common layouts and component patterns, including code snippets. For example:

See the Pen Grid To Flex -- Example 1 by Una Kravets (@una) on CodePen.

Server-Side Visualization With Nightmare

This is an extract from chapter 11 of Ashley Davis’s book Data Wrangling with JavaScript now available on the Manning Early Access Program. I absolutely love this idea as there is so much data visualization stuff on the web that relies on fully functioning client side JavaScript and potentially more API calls. It’s not nearly as robust, accessible, or syndicatable as it could be. If you bring that data visualization back to the server, you can bring progressive enhancement to the party. All example code and data can be found on GitHub.

When doing exploratory coding or data analysis in Node.js it is very useful to be able to render a visualization from our data. If we were working in browser-based JavaScript we could choose any one of the many charting, graphics, and visualization libraries. Unfortunately, under Node.js, we don’t have any viable options, so how otherwise can we achieve this?

We could try something like faking the DOM under Node.js, but I found a better way. We can make our browser-based visualization libraries work for us under Node.js using a headless browser. This is a browser that has no user interface. You can think of it as a browser that is invisible.

I use Nightmare under Node.js to capture visualizations to PNG and PDF files and it works really well!

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Native-Like Animations for Page Transitions on the Web

Some of the most inspiring examples I’ve seen of front-end development have involved some sort of page transitions that look slick like they do in mobile apps. However, even though the imagination for these types of interactions seem to abound, their presence on actual sites that I visit do not. There are a number of ways to accomplish these types of movement!

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Choosing a Responsive Email Framework: MJML vs. Foundation for Emails

Implementing responsive email design can be a bit of a drag. Building responsive emails isn’t simple at all, it is like taking a time machine back to 2001 when we were all coding website layouts in tables using Dreamweaver and Fireworks.

But there's hope! We have tools available that can make building email much easier and more like coding a modern site. Let’s take a look at a couple of different frameworks that set out to simplify things for us.

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Scroll to the Future

This is an interesting read on the current state of scrollbars and how to control their behavior across operating systems and browsers. The post also highlights a bunch of stuff I didn’t know about, like Element.scrollIntoView() and the scroll-behavior CSS property.

My favorite part of all though? It has to be this bit:

In the modern web, relying heavily on custom JavaScript to achieve identical behavior for all clients is no longer justified: the whole idea of “cross-browser compatibility” is becoming a thing of the past with more CSS properties and DOM API methods making their way into standard browser implementations.

In our opinion, Progressive Enhancement is the best approach to follow when implementing non-trivial scrolling in your web projects.

Make sure you can provide the best possible minimal, but universally supported UX, and then improve with modern browser features in mind.

Speaking of the cross-browser behavior of scrollbars, Louis Hoebregts also has a new post that notes how browsers do not include the scrollbar when dealing with vw units and he provides a nice way of handling it with CSS custom properties.

Kinsta

Huge thanks to Kinsta for sponsoring CSS-Tricks this week! We're big fans of WordPress around here, and know some of you out there are too. So this might come of interest: Kinsta is WordPress hosting that runs on Google Cloud Platform. And in fact, it's officially recommended by Google Cloud for fully-managed WordPress hosting.

What does that matter? Well, when you go with a cloud host you're entering a new realm of reliability. For example, your site is run in its own isolated container, including all the software required to run it. Familiar stuff like PHP, MySQL, and Nginx. Those resources are 100% private and not shared between anyone else - not even other sites of yours.

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VuePress Static Site Generator

VuePress is a new tool from Vue creator Evan You that spins up Vue projects that are more on the side of websites based on content and markup than progressive web applications and does it with a few strokes of the command line.

We talk a lot about Vue around here, from a five-part series on getting started with it to a detailed implementation of a serverless checkout cart

But, like anything new, even the basics of getting started can feel overwhelming and complex. A tool like VuePress can really lower the barrier to entry for many who (like me) are still wrapping our heads around the basics and tinkering with the concepts.

There are alternatives, of course! For example, Nuxt is already primed for this sort of thing and also makes it easy to spin up a Vue project. Sarah wrote up a nice intro to Nuxt and it's worth checking out, particularly if your project is a progressive web application. If you're more into React but love the idea of static site generating, there is Gatsby.

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