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Debugging CSS Keyframe Animations

Creating CSS animations may be about learning the syntax, but mastering a beautiful and intuitive-feeling animation requires a bit more nuance. Since animations command so much attention, it's important to refine our code to get the timing right and debug things when they go wrong. After tackling this problem myself, I thought I'd collect some of the tools that exist to aid in this process.…

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Understanding Proxy Browsers 

A new series of posts by Tim Kadlec on proxy browsers and why some people need them:

I'd venture to say that most developers and designers are not big fans of proxy browsers—assuming they pay attention to them at all. They don't behave in ways a typical browser does, which leads to frustration as we see our carefully created sites fall apart for seemingly no reason at all. And frankly, most of us don't really need to use them on a day-to-day basis. Through the lens we view the web, proxy browsers are merely troublesome relics of a time before the idea of a "smartphone" was anything other than a pipe dream.

But our view of the web is not the only view of the web. People all over the world face challenges getting online—everything from the cost of data and poor connectivity to religious and political obstacles. In these environments proxy browsers are far from troublesome; they are essential.

Motion along path in CSS 

From the "I barely knew this was a thing and you can already play with it in browsers" files:

Motion paths allow authors to animate any graphical object along an author-specified path.

I suspect Chrome jumped on this because it's something that was only otherwise doable in SMIL, which they are ditching. I believe this is the first time the full path syntax has made it into CSS? (e.g. motion-path: path('M100,250 C 100,50 400,50 400,250');).

There are some demos on CodePen.

On The Verge 

A fun bit of #hotdrama around mobile web performance.

Apparently it's possible to be of the opinion that slow, sucky websites are the fault of browsers and not the fact that the websites are jam packed with garbage assets.

Scroll-to-top-then-fixed 

Chrome yanked position: sticky;, but Firefox and Safari still have it. Dudley Storey shows how to do the common sidebar pattern where a chunk follows you as you scroll down, but only when there is room for it. He does it in CSS, and the demo polyfills support with stickyfill.

Modern CSS Layout, power and responsibility 

Rachel Andrew reminds us that the power new CSS layout methods gives us could be used to form new anti-patterns:

With this power comes great responsibility. For just as it will be possible for a developer to start out with a beautifully semantic, well structured document and use Grid and Flexbox to meet the design requirements, it will be possible for them to stop caring about the document structure at all. Worse, I believe there will be a strong temptation, especially with Grid, to flatten out document structure in order that all elements become a child of the element with the Grid declared. Making layout simple, but at what cost?

#141: Getting the Images and Numbers for Responsive Images

You know about responsive images. It's about the image syntax in HTML. If you give it the right information in the right syntax, you can get the browser to download just exactly the right image it needs, without giving it too much or too little image data. It's fantastic for performance.

You know that to get the most out of responsive images you should polyfill it with Picturefill. You download it, you include it on your page.

You have …

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