Build Nodejs APIs Using Serverless

Simona Cotin did a great talk at Microsoft Build about Serverless technologies, called "Build Node APIs Using Serverless." In this talk, she addresses pretty much every major gotcha that you might run into while creating Serverless infrastructure for JavaScript applications. Some of the topics included, but are not limited to:

  • CORS
  • Local Debugging with VS Code
  • Installing npm packages
  • Configuring REST-like URLs
  • Saving environment variables

All in all, it's one of the best talks on Serverless I've seen, and if you're interested in this topic, then I highly suggest giving it a watch.

How React Reconciliation Works

React is fast! Some of that speed comes from updating only the parts of the DOM that need it. Less for you to worry about and a speed gain to boot. As long as you understand the workings of setState(), you should be good to go. However, it’s also important to familiarize yourself with how this amazing library updates the DOM of your application. Knowing this will be instrumental in your work as a React developer.

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The Ultimate Guide to Headless CMS

The World Has Changed—So Must the CMS

Having a responsive website is no longer enough. Your audience expects a seamless and personalized customer experience across all their devices—the age of headless technology is coming.

Headless CMS is the next generation in content management for brands that want to stay ahead of the curve by engaging customers through the growing number of channels.

Download The Ultimate Guide to Headless CMS ebook for a deep look into what headless CMS is, and why it should be at the top of your list when choosing a new CMS.

Download the ebook now!

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Responsive tables, revisited

Lea Verou with some extra super fancy CSS trickery. No way we could miss linking this one up!

One of the problems with responsive table solutions, at least the ones where you are using CSS to rejigger things, is that there is duplicated content somewhere. Either in CSS or HTML.

Lea finds two ways to prevent that. One of which uses text-shadow to "duplicate" a copy of the text and move it into place. Another uses the Firefox-only element() function.

Another thing to remember: if you're forcing table elements to anything other than their natural display value (like block), make sure to use ARIA roles so they don't lose their accessibility usefulness.

The backdrop-filter CSS property

I had never heard of the backdrop-filter property until yesterday, but after a couple of hours messing around with it I’m positive that it’s nothing more than magic. This is because it adds filters (like changing the hue, contrast or blur) of the background of an element without changing the text or other elements inside.

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A Strategy Guide To CSS Custom Properties

CSS preprocessor variables and CSS custom properties (often referred to as "CSS variables") can do some of the same things, but are not the same.

Practical advice from Mike Riethmuller:

If it is alright to use static variables inside components, when should we use custom properties? Converting existing preprocessor variables to custom properties usually makes little sense. After all, the reason for custom properties is completely different. Custom properties make sense when we have CSS properties that change relative to a condition in the DOM — especially a dynamic condition such as :focus, :hover, media queries or with JavaScript.

designsystems.com

The team at Figma has created a new resource for “learning, creating and evangelizing design systems” called Design Systems that already has a good collection of interviews and articles by some folks thinking about these things.

I particularly liked Jeroen Ransijn’s post on how to convince your company it’s ready for a design system, where he writes:

Building a design system is not about reaching a single point in time. It’s an ongoing process of learning, building, evangelizing and driving adoption in your organization.

Design systems are a popular topic. Ethan Marcotte recently looked at instances where patterns get weird, Lucan Lemonnier shared a process for creating a consistent design system in Sketch, and Brad Frost debunked the perception that design systems are rigid. Seems like Figma's new site will be a nice curated repository of this ongoing discussion.

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