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I like how percentage background-position works

I learned something the other day when we were fleshing out the background properties in the Almanac. It's such an intuitive thing, that I guess I just never stopped to think about it before.

By default, background-position is 0 0, the top left corner. Now imagine you set it to 50% 0. That background image is now center top. It figures out the size of that image, and positions the center of it at the center of …

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Quantity Queries for CSS 

Heydon Pickering with some clever CSS selectors like:

li:nth-last-child(n+6),
li:nth-last-child(n+6) ~ li {
  /* Selects all list items if there are 6 or more */
}

Similar to Matt Mastracci's article where he focuses on styles for groups of specific numbers.

Using AngularJS for Data Visualisations

The following is a guest post by Nick Moreton. I gotta say I find this idea rather intriguing. I know that I love working in HTML, SVG, and CSS, so when Nick shares that we can use that for structure and use the data directly to style a chart, that appeals to me. And then to know that, because you're using Angular, the chart can automatically change when the data changes... that's just dang cool.

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Dropdown Menus with More Forgiving Mouse Movement Paths

This is a fairly old UX concept that I haven't heard talked about in a while, but is still relevant in the case of multi-level dropdown menus. A fine-grained pointer like a mouse sometimes has to travel through pretty narrow corridors to accurately get where it needs to in a dropdown menu. It's easy to screw up (have the mouse pointer leave the path) and be penalized by having it close up on you. Perhaps we can make that less …

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Polylion

The following is a guest post by Dennis Gaebel. Dennis created some pretty captivating polygon SVG effects on CodePen, and here he'll share how he did it.

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Sponsored: Hack Reactor Remote Beta – Now With Need-Blind Tuition Deferral 

Since Hack Reactor's Remote Beta online coding school kicked off its first cohort this past July, it’s grown into a program that rivals the company’s renowned onsite course in educational quality and student experience.

In an effort to showcases confidence in the employability of Remote Beta Software Engineers, Hack Reactor has recently announced a need-blind tuition model, never before seen in online immersion education. Starting with the March 23 class:

  • Eligible Remote Beta students can now defer up to $15,000 out of the program's $17,780 tuition cost into an interest-free payment plan.
  • Payments are capped as a percentage of monthly income beginning after the students find jobs and start working.

This new tuition model is designed to be attractive to applicants who are unable to afford the full cost of Remote Beta and expand the reach of the program by breaking down one of the few remaining barriers for otherwise talented and motivated people to join the rapidly growing software engineering industry.

Apply today or learn more about this opportunity on Hack Reactor's blog.

Accidental CSS Resets

Any time you use a shorthand property in CSS, you set all the values for all the properties it deals with. It's not a bug, it's just how CSS works. I've seen it confuse people plenty of times. Let's shine a light on the issue to hopefully make it more understood.…

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Thoughts on the Advertising Ecosystem

There are lots of business on the web. One type of those is a website that sells products or services. Those websites employ people who work on the site, incur server costs, material costs, etc. The products and services they provide are useful to people, and they pay for them. Business. Cool.

Those websites need customers. They need people to come to those sites. There are all sorts of ways to do that. Word of mouth. SEO. Wear a costume …

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#136: Moving Things to a CMS as Needed

In this video, I prattle on about a particular "real world" situation I was in involving how I handle the CodePen Meetups page.

At the very beginning days of CodePen Meetups, we just had a single one planned. It was to be the first ever CodePen Meetup in Austin, Texas. So I made a page for it as part of the main CodePen website (a Rails project) at the URL /meetups/. There, I got to design it however I wanted. …

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