Remote Control WordPress at Scale

This is the third and final article in a series on "remote control WordPress". That's my nickname for this strategy of managing network settings on one "control" install, and then pulling those values into all your client installs. The advantage is that it saves staff members from having to toggle the same settings on the same network plugins, across many multisite installs.

(more…)

New `video` Policies for iOS  

This is pretty big news: earlier today the WebKit team announced that iOS 10 will now support silent <video> elements with the autoplay attribute, which is a big deal for performance. Jer Noble describes the update in much more detail:

It turns out that people these days really like GIFs. But the GIF format turns out to be a very expensive way to encode animated images when compared to a modern video codec like H.264. We’ve found that GIFs can be up to twelve times as expensive in bandwidth and twice as expensive in energy use. It’s so expensive that many of the largest GIF providers have been moving away from GIFs and toward the <video> element. Since most of these GIFs started out their lives as video clips, were converted into animated GIFs, and were again converted back to video clips, you might say that the circle is complete.

Using the fieldset and legend elements  

Leonie Watson:

You should use the <fieldset> and <legend> elements when:

  • You have a single multiple choice question (using radio buttons or checkboxes).
  • You have several questions relating to the same topic (like text boxes, or any other type of field).

You should not use the <fieldset> and <legend> when:

  • You have a single form field that asks for a single piece of information.

Learning to COPE with Microservices

I vividly remember my first encounter with a content management system: It was 2002 with a platform called PHP-Nuke. It offered a control panel where site administrators could publish new content that would be immediately available to readers, without the need to create/edit HTML files and upload them via FTP (which at the time was the only reality I knew).

Once I'd made the jump to a CMS, I didn't look back. CMSs quickly became part of my toolkit as a web developer, and I didn’t really stop to question how they worked. I spent a lot of time learning my way around the various components of the web stack; falling in and out of love with different languages, paradigms, frameworks and tools. It took me a long time to stop and think about the most important part of any system: how it manages and stores content.

I set out on a quest to learn more about what's under the hood of a CMS (more…)

OAuth Fun with OAuth1

This is the second article in a three-part series about using the WP API to achieve something I'm calling "Remote Control WordPress", a lifestyle where you'd manage network settings on a "control" install, and have other "client" installs pull their settings from the control. The advantage of this is that you could then manage the settings for many WordPress installs all in one place. The first article laid out how to register network settings as a custom endpoint in the WP API, but stopped short of demonstrating how to grab those settings when they are protected by a permissions callback, which they should be. This article picks up that thread, demonstrating how to pass OAuth credentials to the WP API.

(more…)

#148: Laying Things Out (HTML & Flexbox) with Dee Gill

In this pairing screencast, I hang out with Dee Gill. We take a look at some layout stuff for a new app she's working on: Tinge. She had a design mockup she was working from, so we peak at that and try and build it out in HTML and CSS. We start at the top and focus on the navigation, using flexbox heavily to do what we need to do. …

Watch Video →

We have a pretty good* newsletter.