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Considerations When Choosing Fonts for a Multilingual Website

As a front-end developer working for clients all over the world, I’ve always struggled to deal with multilingual websites — especially cases where both right-to-left (RTL) and left-to-right (LTR) are used. That said, I’ve learned a few things along the way and am going to share a few tips in this post.

Let’s work in Arabic and English, not just because Arabic is my native language, but because it’s a classic example of RTL in use.

Adding RTL support to a site

Before this though, we’ll want to add support for an RTL language on our site. There … Read article “Considerations When Choosing Fonts for a Multilingual Website”

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Shipping system fonts to GitHub.com

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Implementing system fonts on Booking.com — A lesson learned

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System Font Stack

Defaulting to the system font of a particular operating system can boost performance because the browser doesn’t have to download any font files, it’s using one it already had. That’s true of any “web safe” font, though. The beauty of “system” fonts is that it matches what the current OS uses, so it can be a comfortable look.

What are those system fonts? At the time of this writing, it breaks down as follows:… Read article “System Font Stack”

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System Fonts in SVG

There was a time when the smart move in picking fonts for a website was to a font-family that was supported across as many platforms as possible. font-family: Tahoma; and whatnot. Or even better, a font stack that would fall back to as-similar-as possible stuff, like font-family: Tahoma, Verdana, Segoe, sans-serif;.

These days, an astonishing number of sites are using custom fonts. 60%!

No surprise, there is also a decent amount of pushback on custom fonts. They need to … Read article “System Fonts in SVG”