video

Full Page Background Video Styles

Making a full page background video is slightly trickier than a full page background image. Over on the Media Temple blog, I take a look at how that's done, but then also what the design patterns are once you've done it. You likely need text over top the video, so do you center it? Do you let the page scroll and cover the video? Do you get fancy and fade out the header as you scroll?

Optimizing GIFs for the Web

Ire Aderinokun describes a frustrating problem that we’ve probably all noticed at one point or another:

Recently, I’ve found that some of my articles that are GIF-heavy tend to get incredibly slow. The reason for this is that each frame in a GIF is stored as a GIF image, which uses a lossless compression algorithm. This means that, during compression, no information is lost in the image at all, which of course results in a larger file size.

To solve the performance problem of GIFs on the web, there are a couple of things we can do.

Switching to the <video> element seems to have the biggest impact on file size but there are other optimization tools if you have to stick with the GIF format.

The Art of Labeling

There's a lot of neat tricks in this video by Rob Dodson where he focuses on accessibility tricks in Chrome's DevTools. A few notes:

  • Chrome DevTools has an experimental feature to help with accessibility testing that you can unlock if you head to chrome://flags/ and turn on in the DevTools settings.
  • Wrapping an <input type="checkbox"> in a <label> gives the input a name of the text in the label, even without a for attribute.
  • The aria-labelledby attribute overrides the name of the element with the text taken from a different element, referenced by ID. It can even compose a name together from multiple elements, including itself.
  • Adding tabindex='0' to an element will make it focusable.

New `video` Policies for iOS

This is pretty big news: earlier today the WebKit team announced that iOS 10 will now support silent <video> elements with the autoplay attribute, which is a big deal for performance. Jer Noble describes the update in much more detail:

It turns out that people these days really like GIFs. But the GIF format turns out to be a very expensive way to encode animated images when compared to a modern video codec like H.264. We’ve found that GIFs can be up to twelve times as expensive in bandwidth and twice as expensive in energy use. It’s so expensive that many of the largest GIF providers have been moving away from GIFs and toward the <video> element. Since most of these GIFs started out their lives as video clips, were converted into animated GIFs, and were again converted back to video clips, you might say that the circle is complete.

Resilience

Jeremy Keith’s talk from last year’s ColdFront conference is all about the fragility of the modern web. Jeremy talks about languages, such as Javascript, that have a “fragile error handling model” and why simple markup is much more resilient and error prone in comparison.

He has three principles for being a good citizen of the web:

  1. Identify core functionality of your website.
  2. Make that available using the simplest technology.
  3. Enhance!

Bonus conference talk! Our own Sarah Drasner at ForwardJS Summit with SVG and GreenSock for Complex Animation.

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