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WordPress Comment Spam

Akismet is an incredible spam preventer for WordPress sites. I'd say it does 95% of the work for us. A few issues though make me want to augment it with other tools:

  1. Some spam still slips through
  2. It doesn't prevent spam that seems easy to block
  3. There are false-positives, so spam still needs to be checked
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Implementing Webmentions

We get a decent amount of comments on blog posts right here on CSS-Tricks (thanks!), but I'd also say the hay day for that is over. These days, if someone writes some sort of reaction to a blog post, it could be on their own blog, or more likely, on some social media site. It makes sense. That's their home base and it's more useful to them to keep their words there.

It's a shame, though. This fragmented conversation is … Read article

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Chris Coyier
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Lazy-Loading Disqus Comments

Lately, I've been obsessed with optimizing performance through lazy-loading. Recently, I've written on how to lazy-load Google Maps and on how to lazy-load responsive Google Adsense. Now it's time for Disqus, a service for embedding comments on your website. It's a great service. It eliminates the headache of developing your own local commenting system, dealing with spam, etc. Recently, I've been working on implementing the widget in one of my projects.… Read article

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We Asked 8,500 Internet Commenters Why They Do What They Do

Read Christie Aschwanden's first paragraph. If you've written anything that elicits comments, I'm sure you can relate.

There is plenty of data here to digest, and also further speculation:

I had a hypothesis: Maybe this commenting-without-reading phenomenon represents a variation of the backfire effect, in which a person who receives evidence that their belief is erroneous actually becomes more strongly convinced of the viewpoint they already held. In this case, the reader sees a headline that catches their interest and

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Chris Coyier
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The dark side of Guardian comments

As part of a series on the rising global phenomenon of online harassment, the Guardian commissioned research into the 70m comments left on its site since 2006 and discovered that of the 10 most abused writers eight are women, and the two men are black. Hear from three of those writers, explore the data and help us host better conversations online

Nice to see some real research corroborate what so many people have felt to be be true.

This is … Read article

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Robin Rendle
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