api

Improving Conversations using the Perspective API

I recently came across an article by Rory Cellan-Jones about a new technology from Jigsaw, a development group at Google focused on making people safer online through technology. At the time they'd just released the first alpha version of what they call The Perspective API. It's a machine learning tool that is designed to rate a string of text (i.e. a comment) and provide you with a Toxicity Score, a number representing how toxic the text is.

The system learns by seeing how thousands of online conversations have been moderated and then scores new comments by assessing how "toxic" they are and whether similar language had led other people to leave conversations. What it's doing is trying to improve the quality of debate and make sure people aren't put off from joining in.

As the project is still in its infancy it doesn't do much more than that. Still, we can use it!

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The API-Based CMS Approach

For each type of content you need for your site, you develop in three steps:

  1. Create the custom content type and configure its fields
  2. Set up your app to retrieve that content from the API
  3. Load the content into your page template

Let's take a look at each of these steps in a little more detail as I walk through how to set up a simple news article website (demo website) with a homepage and article pages.

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Declarative Data Fetching with GraphQL

The following is a guest post by Nilan Marktanner from Graph.cool. I don't know about y'all but I've spent plenty of time in my career dealing with REST API's. It's a matter of always trying to figure out what URL to hit, what data to expect back, and how you can control that data. A quick glance at GraphQL makes it seem like it simplifies things both for the creators and consumers of the API. Let's let Nilan explain.

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Learning to COPE with Microservices

I vividly remember my first encounter with a content management system: It was 2002 with a platform called PHP-Nuke. It offered a control panel where site administrators could publish new content that would be immediately available to readers, without the need to create/edit HTML files and upload them via FTP (which at the time was the only reality I knew).

Once I'd made the jump to a CMS, I didn't look back. CMSs quickly became part of my toolkit as a web developer, and I didn’t really stop to question how they worked. I spent a lot of time learning my way around the various components of the web stack; falling in and out of love with different languages, paradigms, frameworks and tools. It took me a long time to stop and think about the most important part of any system: how it manages and stores content.

I set out on a quest to learn more about what's under the hood of a CMS (more…)

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