responsive tables

Short note on what CSS display properties do to table semantics

We've blogged about responsive tables a number of times over the years. There's a variety of techniques, and which you choose should be based on the data in the table and the UX you're going for. But many of them rely upon resetting a table element's natural display value to something else, for example display: block. Steve Faulkner warns us:

When CSS display: block or display: grid or display: flex is set on the table element, bad things happen. The table is no longer represented as a table in the accessibility tree, row elements/semantics are no longer represented in any form.

He argues that the browser is making a mistake here by altering those semantics, but since they do, it's good to know it's fixable with (a slew of) ARIA roles.

Here's more from Adrian Roselli including a demo with proper markup.

An Idea for a Simple Responsive Spreadsheet

How do you make a spreadsheet-like interface responsive without the use of any JavaScript? This is the question I've been asking myself all week as I've been working on a new project and trying to figure out how to make the simplest spreadsheet possible. I wanted to avoid using a framework and instead, I decided to experiment with some new properties in order to use nothing but a light touch of CSS.


Responsive Data Tables

Tables of data can only squish horizontally so far, so they can be a pain to browse on small screens (like mobile devices) where you may need to scroll both horizontally and vertically to browse the information at readable text sizes. We'll explore a CSS-based possible-solution to this issue.