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To grid or not to grid

Sarah Higley does accessibility work and finds that “tables and grids are over-represented in accessibility bugs.”

The drum has been banged a million times: don’t use a <table> for layout. But what goes around comes around. What’s the the #1 item in a list of “some of the ways tables and grids can go wrong”?

Using a grid when a table is needed, or vice versa

The day has come. CSS grid has dug its way into usage so deeply that developers are using it by default instead of using a classic <table>. And we don’t even have flying cars yet!

Sarah shows clear examples of both techniques and how the same information can be presented in different ways both visually and semantically. For example, a list of upcoming concerts can be displayed as a <table>, and that might be fine if you can imagine the purpose of the table being used for sorting or comparing, but it can also be presented as a grid, which has other advantages, like headers that are easier to skim.

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