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Managing images in your website design/build

  • sly
    # March 6, 2012 at 6:00 pm

    Hi, dumb question really, but I’d be interested to know how people manage their ‘images’ folder in their html website design.

    When the site is first designed you put your nicely cropped pictures in the images folder and reference them in your html. Then the client makes umpteen changes to the style and design, causing you to make many new and re-cropped pics to add to the folder.

    Now, how do you make sure there aren’t loads of old, unused pics in the images folder?

    I’d love to know how people keep track of it, and keep the images folder lean.

    Thanks,

    Sly.

    # March 6, 2012 at 7:19 pm

    I generally try to replace the graphic with the same name and let Git / Dropbox / Time Machine take care of the previous versions.

    Other than that, I don’t particularly see the need to be keeping the folder lean!

    # March 7, 2012 at 9:29 am

    From the question, it sounds like someone is overusing images for design purposes.

    To me, images are content (with the exception of logos of course).

    # March 7, 2012 at 9:59 am

    @Paulie_D I think what @sly meant is the images that are part of the design (at least that’s how I interpreted it). Gradients, patterns, backgrounds, logos, etc. Those things can definitely be a pain to keep up-to-date and not cluttered over time, while the designer changes things.

    In my case, I try to keep that folder as clean as possible by removing images from it as soon as I know they won’t be used anymore, and from time to time I go through it to see if there’s anything in there that can be removed. In essence, it doesn’t matter that much if there are images in that folder that aren’t used anymore, but I personally like to keep things clean and organized.

    # March 7, 2012 at 11:27 am

    @Senff That was my point.

    Logos / BG images are the exceptions of course, but (to my mind) images should not be used for design purposes unless absolutely necessary. The ‘cropped’ images referred to in the OP make me feel that something else is going on.

    Otherwise, I agree, having an unused image on your site is not a problem unless server capacity is an issue…except if you’re neat freak like me. :)

    sly
    # March 7, 2012 at 11:38 am

    Thanks,

    Yes, I mostly refer to design elements where the client changes their mind and wanted to see 3 options, and their log in different sizes etc.

    I was wondering if there was a clever way that people keep the images folder clear of dead stuff.

    Thank you for chipping in everyone.

    # March 7, 2012 at 1:34 pm

    I’ve often wondered about this. As site edits are made over time, lots of dead stuff accumulates. (And not just images: documents, media, scripts, and even database tables). I guess you simply have to be really conscientious to clear stuff out as you go along. Or just deal with the clutter.

    # March 7, 2012 at 2:22 pm

    I suppose with technology as it is, you rarely need to use images now. Gradients should all be done with CSS, you can create amazing buttons with CSS as well.

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