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Just finished the PHP class on Codecademy.com… Now what?

  • NIX
    # May 21, 2013 at 6:04 pm

    I just finished the class/module on PHP on Codecademy.com. I’m wondering where I should go from here.

    Should I continue reading up on PHP and going into some intermediate stuff or should I just try to start working with what I know?

    Maybe the best thing would be to scratch build a WordPress theme so I can tackle some real-world problems?

    What does everyone think?

    # May 21, 2013 at 6:55 pm

    [OOPHP](http://www.phpfreaks.com/tutorial/oo-php-part-1-oop-in-full-effect), fwiw or you could start solving real world problems. Experimenting with WordPress could be a good start.

    What do you wanna do?

    # May 21, 2013 at 8:02 pm

    @Joe_Temp, If you completed a class/module on codeacademy.com then this probably means you aren’t entirely proficient in PHP. But kudos for learning.. I suggest you try using what you learned and practice, practice, and more practice. Once you are truly comfortable with the subject matter that you have previously dabbled in, try tackling something a little more intermediate.

    My main focus (career wise) is dot net, Microsoft stuff, so when i get free time i try to learn things outside of my domain. I love javascript and jquery so when i want to learn more, i go to these forums and try to fix peoples problems. Why?

    First, not everyone has the same problems, so doing research on something unfamiliar to you will not only help you learn a little something, but help someone else. On top of that, once you fix the problem, or make attempts, you can save that code as a snippet somewhere and later on when you need something like that, wa la!

    Second, proficiency is the product of successful practice. Keep it up, you will be G2G!

    # May 21, 2013 at 8:14 pm

    > not everyone has the same problems, so doing research on something unfamiliar to you will not only help you learn a little something, but help someone else.

    `+100`!

    NIX
    # May 22, 2013 at 12:47 am

    My ultimate goal: To be able to build a site with a login system/user profiles/etc. from SCRATCH.

    I already know HTML and CSS. I now know a bit of PHP. I understand I will also need to know some MySQL and probably some Javascript/jQuery… all of which I’ve dabbled in.

    I’m wondering if I should continue with PHP or try to learn a little MySQL.

    My dilemma is that I love this site: http://learncodethehardway.org/

    That’s where I learned the Python I know. However, there is not a PHP course. BUT… there is a MySQL course!!!

    Should I stick with just PHP for now or learn some MySQL?

    # May 22, 2013 at 12:52 am

    @Joe_Temp, hey man, if your ultimate goal is to build a login/reg system from scratch, i hope it is more or less a mile stone kind of thing. I would hate to see you re-invent the wheel where there are so many great things our there already.

    I totally understand though, i built one as well lol.. I might get shunned for saying this here, but why dont you download Visual Studio Express 2012 and build yourself a login/reg system in the dot net framework :) :)

    Overall, if you wanna be a php programming wizard, MySQL and php run hand and hand, so i say stay focused on php until you are supder D duper comfortable.

    NIX
    # May 22, 2013 at 12:52 am

    Also, I’m a Linux nerd (Fedora 18) and I have LAMP stack installed. Should I start learning some MySQL, just so I can play around with the two?

    # May 22, 2013 at 12:53 am

    Do you have a test environment setup for php and mysql?

    NIX
    # May 22, 2013 at 12:54 am

    @JohnMotylJr Ok, I have some good resources at hand. Practical PHP is pretty good and I can pick up where I left off.

    The most I’d be willing to do is some copy and paste. There are some good (and really bad) scripts already out there for PHP.

    The only thing is… I want to UNDERSTAND why I’m doing what I’m doing. I hate just copying and pasting and not knowing why. You know?

    NIX
    # May 22, 2013 at 12:55 am

    Yeah… I’ve got a virtual Apache server.

    # May 22, 2013 at 12:58 am

    @Joe_Temp, yeah man i hear ya. It is super easy to copy and paste or even copy a video but then at the end you wanna know why you are having problems and not understanding anything.

    I understand about the code too. You browse code snippets and realize it is garbage lol. Why dont you check out Php Academy. I have used a few of their videos before when trying to figure some stuff out. They do a good job of explaining what they are doing and WHY they are doing it that way. Just make sure you try to watch and/or follow along with some more recent videos.

    # May 22, 2013 at 1:00 am

    Oh and yeah, just don’t give up or get frustrated!

    NIX
    # May 22, 2013 at 1:05 am

    Thanks for the advice! MUCH appreciated! And BTW, if anyone wants to learn Python, SQL or Ruby… check out LCTHW!

    I’m not affiliated. However, it taught someone who BARELY got an A in CS1000 how to write code in Python. Although, Python is pretty elegant.

    I’m gonna call this one solved until I devour more reading material.

    # May 22, 2013 at 1:10 am

    @Joe_Temp, thanks for that link. My first year of college i did Python and to be honest i dont remember really anything about it lol.. #def main or something like that lol..

    Anywho, good luck man and post a follow up.

    # May 22, 2013 at 2:58 am

    To add to what has already been stated:

    Yes, it’s a good idea to pick up at least basic MySQL and understanding of databases. As a tip on where to start in thinking, use [PDO](http://php.net/manual/en/book.pdo.php) rather than the mysql* functions in PHP, to get a bit more security.

    I agree with @johnmotyljr that it’s probably a better idea to use “write your own login/profile system” as a milestone rather than the assumption it will be used in production, but doing that is still a great goal. Look over how various places (WordPress, Kohana, CodeIgniter, Laravel) solves the problem, and also consider what problems you see and how to approach them.

    The key word is “planning”. Before you write code, plan out at least the broad strokes of what you’re going to do. What build stones do you need, what should you think about, etc.

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