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Striking a Balance Between Native and Custom Select Elements

Here’s the plan! We’re going to build a styled select element. Not just the outside, but the inside too. Total styling control. Plus we’re going to make it accessible. We’re not going to try to replicate everything that the browser does by default with a native <select> element. We’re going to literally use a <select> element when any assistive tech is used. But when a mouse is being used, we’ll show the styled version and make it function as … Read article “Striking a Balance Between Native and Custom Select Elements”

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Radio Buttons Are Like Selects; Checkboxes Are Like Multiple Selects

I was reading Anna Kaley’s “Listboxes vs. Dropdown Lists” post the other day. It’s a fairly straightforward comparison between different UI implementations of selecting options. There is lots of good advice there. Classics like that you should use radio buttons (single select) or checkboxes (multiple select) if you’re showing five or fewer options, and the different options when the number of options grows from there. … Read article “Radio Buttons Are Like Selects; Checkboxes Are Like Multiple Selects”

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Making a Better Custom Select Element

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The Current State of Styling Selects in 2019

Best I could tell from the last time I compiled the most wished-for features of CSS, styling form controls was a major ask. Top 5, I’d say. And of the native form elements that people want to style, Greg Whitworth has some data that the <select></select> element is more requested than any other element — more than double the next element — and it’s the one developers most often customize in some way.

Developers clearly want to style select … Read article “The Current State of Styling Selects in 2019”

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Styling a Select Like It’s 2019