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Copy the Browser’s Native Focus Styles

Remy documented this the other day. Firefox supports a Highlight keyword and both Chrome and Safari support a -webkit-focus-ring-color keyword. So if you, for example, have removed focus from something and want to put it back in the same style as the browser default, or want to apply a focus style to an element when it isn’t directly in focus itself, this can be useful.… Read article “Copy the Browser’s Native Focus Styles”

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Having a Little Fun With Custom Focus Styles

Every front-end developer has dealt or will deal with this scenario: your boss, client or designer thinks the outline applied by browsers on focused elements does not match the UI, and asks you to remove it. Or you might even be looking to remove it yourself.

So you do a little research and find out that this is strongly discouraged, because the focus outline is there for a reason: it provides visual feedback for keyboard navigation (using the Tab … Read article “Having a Little Fun With Custom Focus Styles”

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The div that looks different in every browser

Almanac

outline-offset

The outline-offset property in CSS offsets a defined outline from an element’s border edge by a specified amount. An outline, which is different from a border, does not take up any space on the page (like an absolutely positioned element) so the outline can be offset in any amount and it will not affect the position or layout of surrounding elements.… Read article “outline-offset”

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Text Stroke: Stuck In The Middle With You

There is a non-standard way to stroke HTML text (SVG has a standard way). It’s not particularly new. There are -webkit- and -moz- prefixes for it. Jen Simmons recently posted about it, with an example:

span {
     -moz-text-fill-color: #fde;
  -webkit-text-fill-color: #fde;
     -moz-text-stroke-color: #666;
  -webkit-text-stroke-color: #666;
     -moz-text-stroke-width: 2px;  
  -webkit-text-stroke-width: 2px;
}

And she’s right:

This CSS isn’t fully-baked or fully-supported. But it’s good enough to be used today, especially since it’s simply offering a visual enhancement. It’s not mission critical

Read article “Text Stroke: Stuck In The Middle With You”
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Adding Stroke to Web Text

Fonts on the web are essentially vector-based graphics. That’s why you can display them at 12px or 120px and they remain crisp and relatively sharp-edged. Vector means that their shape is determined by points and mathematics to describe the shape, rather than actual pixel data. Because they are vector, it would make sense if we could do things that other vector programs (e.g. Adobe Illustrator) can do with vector text, like draw a stroke around the individual characters. Well, we … Read article “Adding Stroke to Web Text”