es2015

Using Default Parameters in ES6

I’ve recently begun doing more research into what’s new in JavaScript, catching up on a lot of the new features and syntax improvements that have been included in ES6 (i.e. ES2015 and later).

You’ve likely heard about and started using the usual stuff: arrow functions, let and const, rest and spread operators, and so on. One feature, however, that caught my attention is the use of default parameters in functions, which is now an official ES6+ feature. This is the ability to have your functions initialize parameters with default values even if the function call doesn’t include them.

The feature itself is pretty straightforward in its simplest form, but there are quite a few subtleties and gotchas that you’ll want to note, which I’ll try to make clear in this post with some code examples and demos.

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Template Literals

The Template Literal, introduced in ES6, is a new way to create a string. With it comes new features that allow us more control over dynamic strings in our programs. Gone will be the days of long string concatenation!

To create a template literal, instead of single quotes (') or double quotes (") quotes we use the backtick (`) character. This will produce a new string, and we can use it in any way we want.

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Transpiling ES6

While support for ES6 is always increasing, we can't always assume that users will be using a browser that supports all its features. So, in order to utilize ES6 features now and make sure we won't run into cross-browser compatibility issues, we need to transpile our code.

Let's look at two possible ways we can perform the task of transpiling our code. First, we will use npm scripts and Babel. For the second, we will look at using Gulp with Babel.

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