Emojis as Icons

There are lots of unicode symbols that make pretty good icons already, like arrows (←), marks (✘), and objects (✂︎).You can already colorize these like a normal font glyph. Then, there are emojis, those full-color suckers we all know about. What if you could take just the shape of an emoji and use it like a normal glyph? You can!

Preethi Sam shows how:

.icon {
  color: transparent;
  text-shadow: 0 0 #ec2930;
}

Plus, an alternate technique using background-clip. Note that emojis render differently across platforms, so careful!

Hyperlinking Beyond the Web

Hyperlinks are the oldest and the most popular feature of the web. The word hypertext (which is the ht in http/s) means text having hyperlinks. The ability to link to other people’s hypertext made the web, a web — a set of connected pages. This fundamental feature has made the web a very powerful platform and it is obvious that the world of apps needs this feature. All modern platforms support a way for apps to register a URI (custom protocol) and also have universal links (handling web links in an app).

Let’s see why we’d want to take advantage of this feature and how to do it.

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Delivering WordPress in 7KB

Over the past six months, I've become increasingly interested in the topic of web sustainability. The carbon footprint of the Internet was not something I used to give much thought to, which is surprising considering my interest in environmental issues and the fact that my profession is web-based.

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itty.bitty

Mark this down as one of the strangest things I’ve seen in a good long while. Nicholas Jitkoff has made a tool called itty.bitty that creates websites with all of the assets being contained within their own link. You can create a website without any HTML or CSS resources at all because it’s all been base64 encoded into the URL itself.

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The CSS Paint API

The CSS Paint API is extremely exciting, not only for what it is, but what it represents, which is the beginning of a very exciting time for CSS. Let’s go over what it is, why we have it and how to start using it.

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#163: First Steps with Serverless

David Wells, from Netlify, and I take some baby steps into building things with Serverless. We'll mostly be looking at cloud functions here and how using them from an otherwise static hosting environment means you've unlocked all sorts of possibilities.

Links from the video:

CSS Grid in IE: Faking an Auto-Placement Grid with Gaps

This is the third and final part in a three-part series about using CSS grid safely in Internet Explorer 11 (IE11) without going insane.

In Part 1, I covered some of the common misconceptions that people have about IE11’s native CSS grid implementation. In Part 2, I showed the world how easy it actually is to write IE-friendly CSS grid code.

Today, I’m going step away from CSS grid for a moment to show you a flexbox technique that replicates basic CSS grid auto-placement functionality. This CSS grid replica will even look like a grid-gap has been applied to it. I need to be super clear though: this is not about how to make actual CSS grid auto-placement work in IE.

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#162: What the Heck is Serverless?

David Wells, from Netlify, and I take a crack at answering this question in an understandable way.

Are there still servers involved? Of course, but you don't manage them, scale them, or pay for them when you aren't using them. It really is a different model that deserves a new name.

Better yet, they enable front-end developers like us to do more than we ever thought we could. We'll cover a variety of use cases that might get you thinking.

Prototyping in the Browser

Prototyping animations and interactions is vital for a number of reasons: they can make your interface feel deceptively fast, they can help focus the user on a specific task, and they can provide a better sense of the current state of your application. Is data being loaded? Is something now unclickable? How long do they have to wait until they can perform an action?

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​Reinvest Your Time with HelloSign API

HelloSign API makes it simple to embed secure and legally binding eSignatures directly into any website. It's 2x faster to implement than other eSign solutions and is also the only eSign API that allows customers to completely white label the integration, meaning our customers can give their customers a seamless, native signing experience. The three key features of the HelloSign API are the ability to collect signatures, request signatures, and format documents for signing directly on any site. Integrations go smoothly with help from tools like the API Dashboard, an industry-first feature that makes it easy for developers to debug and view critical information about API requests and responses. What are you going to do with all that time you saved by using HelloSign API?

Try it free today

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