Welcome!

The goal of this course is to take you, you beautiful front end developer you, from someone with very little or no jQuery or JavaScript knowledge and up you to someone who is quite comfortable working with and writing jQuery and JavaScript.

There are other courses out there, this one is mine. We'll make mistakes along the way. We'll fix them. We'll talk about theory. We'll build practical, real things.

jQuery is monstrous in its popularity and ubiquity on the web. It doesn't do everything, but what it does it does very well and that makes it part of nearly every major websites toolkit.

It is great at all the "DOM" stuff - selecting and manipulating elements on the page. It's great at handling events. It has a nice API for all kinds of stuff - the "chaining" idea is very nice. It helps tremendously with Ajax. It helps with animation. The world of plugins around it is vast. While doing all this, perhaps the most compelling feature is that it handles the cross-browser problems for you.

We'll talk about all that in more in this course.

Comments

  1. User Avatar
    Jotpreet Singh
    Permalink to comment#

    Awesome

  2. User Avatar
    jake huffman
    Permalink to comment#

    The download links on the jQuery archive page aren’t working. They work on the single page and on the other course archive pages.

    • User Avatar
      Chris Coyier
      Permalink to comment#

      Could you let me know exactly what you mean? Perhaps a screenshot of the page with an arrow pointing to the broken link?

      WAIT I FOUND IT. Fixing.

  3. User Avatar
    Suzanne Seale
    Permalink to comment#

    When is it best to use CSS3 and when should I use jquery?

    • User Avatar
      Chris Coyier
      Permalink to comment#

      Hi Suzanne,

      There are some overlaps here and there, but in general CSS and JavaScript are used for very different things. CSS is for styling, JavaScript is for functionality. For instance:

      • I need to make this button round: CSS
      • I need to check the strength of this password: JavaScript

      Then there are intersections:

      • I need to hide this area when the user clicks this button: Both. The click = JavaScript, which applies a class name. CSS = hides with that class name.

      Sometimes this question comes up with animation as well, and that is answered in the video specifically about animation. Generally, CSS is best for that.

  4. User Avatar
    Kirateachings
    Permalink to comment#

    Awesome! Very happy to subscribe to your course Chris!

  5. User Avatar
    Charles McKeever
    Permalink to comment#

    Hey Chris. Looking forward to making my way through the course. I really enjoy your laid-back presentation style. It keeps me relaxed and open as I’m taking in what you’re sharing. I’ve worked with jQuery “indirectly” when working with various WordPress plugins, but for historical reasons have always avoided client side scripting as a general rule in my own development. But, now that things like jQuery are so mature and widely supported, it’s time to embrace it all. Thanks for putting this course together.

  6. User Avatar
    Mike Palmer
    Permalink to comment#

    Not sure if this is the best place for this comment, or if you’re still keeping track of this thread. Going through some of the Lodge videos, I was wondering, do you think you could add the “Mark as Viewed” text underneath the Next Video link, or something like that. It would help a bit with going through the videos, without having to go back to the main listing to mark them off. Just a thought. Otherwise, been really enjoying this content, hope to see more soon.

    • User Avatar
      Chris Coyier
      Permalink to comment#

      Will consider, thanks Mike. If anyone else has an opinion on that, let me know. Generally like to keep these comment threads about the content in the videos. This is fine, but if it becomes a big thread I may need to bury and we can move to email.

  7. User Avatar
    James Graham
    Permalink to comment#

    This is going to be great! :)

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