How do you include more advanced languages into your Web Development? (ie. Python, Java, C++, etc.)

  • # November 5, 2012 at 1:26 am

    I’ve been a web developer for a couple years now. I think I know about as much HTML and CSS as I’ll ever need to know. At least for a while. I know there are always more CSS and HTML developments. And my Javascript is passable, I always find a way to do what I need. Same with PHP.

    But now I want to look into more advanced things, like Python, Java, or C++. How do you have these technologies interact with a website? What are things done with them? Any standards uses?

    Any info would be helpful before I start going on a Google-spree.

    # November 5, 2012 at 2:36 am

    I would suggest that it’s probably better to become completely comfortable in PHP or JS before venturing elsewhere unless you have a specific goal in mind.

    # November 5, 2012 at 3:12 am

    PHP is very great.

    # November 5, 2012 at 5:41 am

    I think I know about as much HTML and CSS as I’ll ever need to know

    This is a pretty bold statement (even when you consider “at least for a while”). :)

    # November 5, 2012 at 3:29 pm

    @TheDoc, I’m still learning, but I’d like to broaden my learning by at least being farmiliar with other technologies.

    @Chandra, I know (even though PHP has some issues).

    @Senff, I only say that because I can HTML/CSS pretty much any site that I need to at work. There is always little CSS things I discover from time to time and of course there’s the new HTML5 elements that I’m still learning.

    # November 5, 2012 at 3:32 pm

    I guess my point is… why bother knowing a tiny bit of a lot of languages/technologies when you can master a few that can get the majority of things done. Unless you plan on building apps, there’s no need to venture into the territories that you mentioned above, *especially* if you haven’t mastered simple programming languages like PHP and JS.

    # November 5, 2012 at 4:18 pm

    It’s not necessarily so I can build stand alone projects on my own. It’s so I can be familiar with other peoples code and communicate properly with those who right them when our goals overlap.

    # November 5, 2012 at 4:31 pm

    Unless you want to venture into software programming, I would just stick with languages that help you build amazing websites. In my opinion, stick with HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP, Ruby on Rails, Django, things like that.

    __
    # November 5, 2012 at 9:22 pm

    This reply has been reported for inappropriate content.

    It’s not necessarily so I can build stand alone projects on my own. It’s so I can be familiar with other peoples code and communicate properly with those who right them when our goals overlap.

    This goal will be much better served by learning one language very well than by having “passable” skills in several (or any number) of languages.

    Given 1) a skilled programmer who’s never even heard of the language I use, and 2) one who is basically a “beginner” in every language under the sun, I can say without hesitation that I’d pick Programmer #1 every day of the week, and twice on Sunday.

    Even if he didn’t use deodorant.

    # November 5, 2012 at 10:07 pm

    Focus on PHP, JS, CSS, SQL and HTML. Thats all you need for just about anything spectacular on the web these days. And if you can write/read those inside and out, picking up a new language doesn’t take as long. You’ll have the concepts down, just some syntax studying and some practice.

    # November 6, 2012 at 12:21 am

    speaking purely in relation to web development, instead of learning entirely new languages why not get better than passable with javascript?

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