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Weaving One Element Over and Under Another Element

In this post, we’re going to use CSS superpowers to create a visual effect where two elements overlap and weave together. The epiphany for this design came during a short burst of spiritual inquisitiveness where I ended up at The Bible Project’s website. They make really cool animations, and I mean, really cool animations.… Read article

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The Making of an Animated Favicon

It’s the first thing your eyes look for when you’re switching tabs.

That’s one way of explaining what a favicon is. The tab area is a much more precious screen real-estate than what most assume. If done right, besides being a label with icon, it can be the perfect billboard to represent what’s in or what’s happening on a web page.… Read article

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A Few Functional Uses for Intersection Observer to Know When an Element is in View

You might not know this, but JavaScript has stealthily accumulated quite a number of observers in recent times, and Intersection Observer is a part of that arsenal. Observers are objects that spot something in real-time — like birdwatchers going to their favorite place to sit and wait for the birds to come.

Different observers observe different things (not everyone watches hawks).

The very first observer I came to know was the Mutation Observer that looks for changes to the DOM … Read article

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Extracting Text from Content Using HTML Slot, HTML Template and Shadow DOM

Chapter names in books, quotes from a speech, keywords in an article, stats on a report — these are all types of content that could be helpful to isolate and turn into a high-level summary of what's important.

For example, have you seen the way Business Insider provides an article's key points before getting into the content?

That’s the sort of thing we're going to do, but try to extract the high points directly from the article using HTML Slot, … Read article

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Using the Little-Known CSS element() Function to Create a Minimap Navigator

W3C’s CSS Working Group often gives us brilliant CSS features to experiment with. Sometimes we come across something so cool that sticks a grin on our face, but it vanishes right away because we think, “that’s great, but what do I do with it?” The element() function was like that for me. It’s a CSS function that takes an element on the page and presents it as an image to be displayed on screen. Impressive, but quixotic.… Read article

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Creating sliding effects using sticky positioning

Sticky elements are predominantly used for keeping something shown on the screen throughout scrolling. As cool as that is, we can also hide elements in the same way!… Read article

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Creating a Bar Graph with CSS Grid

If you’re looking for more manageable ways to create bar graphs, or in search of use cases to practice CSS Grid layout, I got you!

Before we begin working on the graph, I want to talk about coding the bars, when Grid is a good approach for graphs, and we’ll also cover some code choices you might consider before getting started.… Read article

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Decorating lines of text with box-decoration-break

An institution’s motto, an artist’s intro, a company’s tagline, a community’s principle, a service’s greeting… all of them have one thing in common: they’re one brief paragraph displayed on a website’s home page — or at least the about page!

It’s rare that just one word or one line of text welcomes you to a website. So, let’s look at some interesting ways we could style the lines of a paragraph.… Read article

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CSS Techniques and Effects for Knockout Text

Knockout text is a technique where words are clipped out of an element and reveal the background. In other words, you only see the background because the letters are knocking out holes. It’s appealing because it opens up typographic styles that we don’t get out of traditional CSS properties, like color.

While we’ve seen a number of ways to accomplish knockout text in the past, there are some modern CSS properties we can use now and even enhance the … Read article

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Counting With CSS Counters and CSS Grid

In this post, we're going to demonstrate how we can use the source order independence of CSS Grid to solve a layout issue that's the result of a source order constraint. Specifically, we're going to look at checkboxes and CSS Counters—two concepts that rely on source order when used together.