Articles by
Kingsley Silas

Compound Components in React Using the Context API

Compound components in React allow you to create components with some form of connected state that’s managed amongst themselves. A good example is the Form component in Semantic UI React.

To see how we can implement compound components in a real-life React application, we’ll build a compound (multi-part) form for login and sign up. The state will be saved in the form component and we’ll put React’s Context AP to use to pass that state and the method from the Context Provider to the component that needs them. The component that needs them? It will become a subscriber to Context Consumers.

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An Overview of Render Props in React

An Overview of Render Props in React

Using render props in React is a technique for efficiently re-using code. According to the React documentation, "a component with a render prop takes a function that returns a React element and calls it instead of implementing its own render logic." To understand what that means, let’s take a look at the render props pattern and then apply it to a couple of light examples.

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Using Event Bus to Share Props Between Vue Components

By default, communication between Vue components happen with the use of props. Props are properties that are passed from a parent component to a child component. For example, here’s a component where title is a prop:

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Props are always passed from the parent component to the child component. As your application increases in complexity, you slowly hit what is called prop drilling here’s a relate article that is React-focused, but totally applies). Prop drilling is the idea of passing props down and down and down to child components — and, as you might imagine, it’s generally a tedious process.

So, tedious prop drilling can be one potential problem in a complex. The other has to do with the communication between unrelated components. We can tackle all of this by making use of an Event Bus.

What is an Event Bus? Well, it’s kind of summed up in the name itself. It’s a mode of transportation for one component to pass props from one component to another, no matter where those components are located in the tree.

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Working With Events in React

Most of the behavior in an application revolves around events. User enters a value in the registration form? Event. User hits the submit button? Another event. Events are triggered a number of ways and we build applications to listen for them in order to do something else in response.

You may already be super comfortable working with events based on your existing JavaScript experience. However, React has a distinct way of handling them. Rather than directly targeting DOM events, React wraps them in their own event wrapper. But we’ll get into that.

Let’s go over how to create, add and listen for events in React.

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Props and PropTypes in React

React encourages developers to build by breaking a UI up into components. This means there will always be a need to pass data from one component to another — more specifically, from parent to child component — since we’re stitching them together and they rely on one another.

React calls the data passed between components props and we’re going to look into those in great detail. And, since we’re talking about props, any post on the topic would be incomplete without looking at PropTypes because they ensure that components are passing the right data needed for the job.

With that, let’s unpack these essential but loaded terms together.

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Working with refs in React

Refs make it possible to access DOM nodes directly within React. This comes in handy in situations where, just as one example, you want to change the child of a component. Let’s say you want to change the value of an <input /> element, but without using props or re-rendering the whole component.

That’s the sort of thing refs are good for and what we’ll be digging into in this post.

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Using data in React with the Fetch API and axios

If you are new to React, and perhaps have only played with building to-do and counter apps, you may not yet have run across a need to pull in data for your app. There will likely come a time when you’ll need to do this, as React apps are most well suited for situations where you’re handling both data and state.

The first set of data you may need to handle might be hard-coded into your React application, like we did for this demo from our Error Boundary tutorial:

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Render Children in React Using Fragment or Array Components

What comes to your mind when React 16 comes up? Context? Error Boundary? Those are on point. React 16 came with those goodies and much more, but In this post, we'll be looking at the rendering power it also introduced — namely, the ability to render children using Fragments and Array Components.

These are new and really exciting concepts that came out of the React 16 release, so let’s look at them closer and get to know them.

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Handling Errors with Error Boundary

Thinking and building in React involves approaching application design in chunks, or components. Each part of your application that performs an action can and should be treated as a component. In fact, React is component-based and, as Tomas Eglinkas recently wrote, we should leverage that concept and err on the side of splitting any large chunking into smaller components.

Splitting inevitably introduces component hierarchies, which are good because they bloated components and architecture. However, things can begin to get complicated when an error occurs in a child component. What happens when the whole application crashes?! Seriously, React, why do the parent and sibling components have to pay for the sins of another component? Why?

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