Treehouse: Grow your CSS skills. Land your dream job.

Article Archives

19 comments

Crop Top

Sometimes you want an image to resize responsively but restrict its height — cropping it then as it widens. Here, we explore three options with various trade-offs.
32 comments

Pizza Time Hovers

Hover Maester Jenn Lukas sent me a link to PizzaTime.com. We agreed that 1) those are some pretty neat hovers! and 2) it's pretty cool that there is a quality website at all at a domain like PizzaTime.com - in which that she typed in randomly hoping there would be.…

Request Quest

Jake Archibald put together an interesting and informative quiz about when browsers actually make requests. I learned a bunch. Some of it might seem like quirky academic knowledge but we all know how often unpredictably weird situations come up in day to day dev work.

Jake wished me to point out that it is unfinished (only works on desktop Chrome) and might hurt your feelings if you can't take browser insult jokes.…

The “When Can I Use” Web Widget

A script from Andi Smith that injects a chart of browser support with live data from Can I Use... I really like the idea of using it on any web tech blog post - so the information about feature support stays up to date over time. I think I'll be incorporating it into this site when I get a chance.

Alexis Deveria is cool with it.

It hits a JSON file at raw.github.com through YQL for the data. I …

19 comments

Using requestAnimationFrame

There used to be just one way to do a timed loop in JavaScript: setInterval(). If you needed to repeat something pretty fast (but not as-fast-as-absolutely-possible like a for loop), you'd use that. For the purposes of animation, the goal is sixty "frames" per second to appear smooth, so you'd run a loop like this: …

35 comments

A Couple of Use Cases for Calc()

calc() is a native CSS way to do simple math right in CSS as a replacement for any length value (or pretty much any number value). It has four simple math operators: add (+), subtract (-), multiply (*), and divide (/). Being able to do math in code is nice and a welcome addition to a language that is fairly number heavy.

But is it useful? I've strained my brain in the past trying to think of obviously useful cases. …

Grids with text-align: justify

Patrick Kunka demos how fluid grids can be created with percentage widths and justified text. I like it because you don't need to think about gutter calculations which is what really complicates grids. If you need specific control over gutters, Don't Overthink It Grids might help. …

93 comments

Sass Style Guide

With more people than ever writing in Sass, it bears some consideration how we format it. CSS style guides are common, so perhaps we can extend those to cover choices unique to Sass.

Here are some ideas that I've been gravitating toward. Perhaps they are useful to you or help you formulate ideas of your own. If you're looking for more examples, Sass Guidelines is another good place to look.…

33 comments

3D Button Parallax

The following is a guest post by Alexander Futekov. We recently published an article by Joshua Bader in which a 3D inset look was adjusted as the page scrolled to give it a more realistic interaction. This is similar only Alexander is using an extruded look on buttons and employing a totally different technique.

This Website Brought To You By…

I always wanted to write something on all the technologies that a website relies on in order to have been created and work. My attempts have so far failed because it spirals out of control so quickly. Kevin Kelly sums it up:

A web page relies on perhaps a hundred thousand other inventions, all needed for its birth and continued existence. There is no web page anywhere without the inventions of HTML code, without computer programming, without LEDs or cathode …

38 comments

Logic in Media Queries

Just in case you have brain farts about this constantly like I do.…

5 comments

CSS-Tricks Chronicle XIII

> go east > You see a beautiful grassy field. > set up camper > You camper is now set up [roundtime: 18 seconds] > sit down

Prepros

Is an open-source app modeled after CodeKit. Prepros runs on Windows where CodeKit is Mac only. From people who have tried it, it seems good.…

Chrome’s requestAutocomplete()

Auto-filling forms is nice because it saves time and is less prone to user error. Even better is not even needing to see a form in the first place.…

47 comments

Replace the Image in an <img> with CSS

The following is a guest post by Marcel Shields. Marcel in a difficult place where he needed to change the image on a page but didn't have access to the HTML. Rare, but I'm sure we've all be in weird situations like this. He explains how he managed to replace that image without needing to access the HTML or JavaScript. Also turns out to be a pretty good way to replace anything with an image.

60 comments

Slider with Sliding Backgrounds

Among the many super nice design features of the Yahoo! Weather app for iOS is the transition between city screens. The background image doesn't just move away as the screen moves from one screen to the next, the background image itself slides. It appears to be hiding some of the "old" screen and revealing more of the "new" screen those closer you have it to being in full view.

Let's try and pull it off on the web.…

38 comments

Photo Swivel

The following is a guest post by Alex Young (@the_alexyoung). Alex has created a simple technique to "rotate" the subject of a photo simply by hiding and showing multiple stacked photographs taken at different angles. Enjoy!

11 comments

Media Query Change Detection in JavaScript Through CSS Animations

The following is a guest post by Alessandro Vendruscolo. Media queries are relevant to both CSS and JS. The need and desire to manage those in one place is real. There have been some clever ways to do this, like Jeremy Keith's Conditional CSS. But in that case, the onus is on you to test after window state changes. You can get a true listener with MediaQueryList, but then you're maintaining the media queries in both places again.

63 comments

Naming Media Queries

It would be pretty cool if we could do this someday in CSS. The best idea for it that I've come across is to define it in a <meta /> tag in the <head></head>. That way (perhaps) CSS could use it and JS could use it. Like window.matchMedia(nameOfMyMediaQuery) or @media (nameOfMyMediaQuery) { }. But since we can't, Sass has our back. Now the question is, how do we name them?…

29 comments

Line Clampin’ (Truncating Multiple Line Text)

You want X lines of text. Anything after that, gracefully cut off. That's "line clamping" and it is a perfectly legit desire. When you can count on text being a certain number of lines, you can create stronger and more reliable grids from the elements that contain that text, as well as achieve some symmetric aesthetic harmony.

There are a couple of ways to get it done, none of them spectacular.…

How to mark up subtitles

Now that <hgroup> is gone, use a <span> inside the main header, or group them with <header> and use a <p> for the subtitle.…

33 comments

3D Inset Parallax Effect

The following is a guest post by Joshua Bader. Joshua noticed that certain 3D effects on the web could benefit from adjusting perspective as the web page is scrolled. I'll let him explain.

People love to make flat things appear as if they're three-dimensional. There are two ways to pull off this effect in a 2D environment, shape and movement.

By give a flat shape the appearance of edges or sides, we can make buttons or other objects appear …

52 comments

Make Client Side Data Available Server Side

UPDATE: I have a newer article "Server Side Mustard Cut" that covers this same ground and has many of the quirks worked out. That's probably a better read.

That would be pretty useful, right? Right now it's very common to User Agent "sniff" when you want to make a server-side decision about what to give the client. But UA sniffing has always sucked and sucks more every day. What you really want to know is stuff like "how big is …

WebP with Fallback

WebP images will save a quarter to a third of the file size over PNG or JPG. Not all browsers are going to support it, but Bruce Lawson shares a way we can use it in such a progressive enhancement kind of way.

Also: <img src="image.webp" onerror="this.onerror=null; this.src='image.png'">

Also: with Modernizr

The CSS-Tricks License

Sometimes people ask me if they can use the stuff they find here. So I thought I'd create a license I can refer them to. …

CSS3 Overflow

Not the most glamorous property is it? But it just might turn out to be. Things like paginated overflow and overflowing into fragments, each of which is selectable and style-able. Could be pretty powerful! Like replacing sliders with browser native controls.

The first Working Draft is out, meaning none of this is set in stone and there are no browser implementations. …

35 comments

Magic Numbers in CSS

Despite the super fun sounding name, magic numbers are a bad thing. It is an old school programming term for "unnamed numerical constant". As in, just some number plunked into the code that is probably vital to things working correctly but are very difficult for anyone not intimately familiar with the code to understand what it is for. CSS is loaded with unnamed numerical constants, but they are usually paired with properties and in the context of a selector so …

WP Migrate DB Pro

I think the most common tech question we get on ShopTalk show is how to keep a WordPress database in sync between live and local. This (paid) plugin can do it right from one admin screen to another by POSTing secure requests of SQL data bit by bit until they are in sync. …

38 comments

Preventing the Performance Hit from Custom Fonts

The issue is 1) custom fonts are awesome and we want to use them 2) custom fonts slow down our pages by being large additional resources. Dealing with this has been in the air recently so I thought I'd round up some of the ideas and add thoughts of my own. …

49 comments

Line-On-Sides Headers

Forums user McAsh wondered how they might code up a design in which there was a large header and a smaller subheader beneath it which featured double horizontal lines jutting out after the text to both the left and right of the centered text. An easy thing to mock up as image, but a much more difficult thing to pull off in CSS because of the variable nature of text (length, size, etc). …

List of Pseudo-Elements to Style Form Controls

Like the little handle on range inputs. You can style that, but it's different in all the major browsers. It's either ::-ms-thumb, ::moz-range-thumb, or ::-webkit-slider-thumb. Obviously an area that would benefit from standardization. …

24 comments

Transitional Interfaces, Coded

Pasquale D’Silva’s article Transitional Interfaces has really been making the rounds. It's a quick read that drives home a great point. Transitions and animations can be more than eye candy. They can help give your brain a clue about what is happening on a page. …

csscss

A CSS redundancy analyzer that analyzes redundancy.

Gives you output like:

{.contact .content .primary} and {article, #comments} share 5 rules

If you have multiple selectors sharing five or more rules (properties with the same value), that's likely a good opportunity for optimization (combine into new class or comma separate selectors elsewhere).

Someone should make a hosted version where you just drag-and-drop a .css file to analyze.…

42 comments

Can You “Over Organize” JavaScript?

There's no question that on sites with lots of JavaScript, you need a strict organizational pattern to keep everything making sense and the code approachable. I've mentioned in the past I like grouping things into individual files each containing a functionality-specific object literal. Taking things a wee bit further, we can be strict about this pattern and make sure we group together all sectors in one place, all "init" functions in one place, all event binding in once place, and …

14 comments

CSS-Tricks Chronicle XII

SITEOWNR: Thers new ifnormation inthe site foryou. (puts on sunglasses). STRETEMAN: yesyes Im hapy !
36 comments

Body Border, Rounded Inside

Reader Arun wrote in with a question on how to make a body border that was rounded where the edges met on the inside. Like this. We've covered body borders before, but this was slightly different. …

Blink

Chrome is going to use "Blink" as a rendering engine now, a fork of WebKit. I imagine the Chromium team will stop committing back to WebKit, so that project will stagnate a bit. Safari is already rather slow to update, and iOS only allows WebKit on browsers, so that's a bit of a bummer. Overall it's probably a good move and keeps Chrome charging forward. No more vendor prefixes, they say.…

48 comments

Pop Hovers

POP has these cool hovers in the boxes that make up their homepage. The boxes have a white background by default, and as you hover over them a dark background slides up behind, the text colors change, and the text "pops" up a little. When you hover off, the dark background slides away, the text colors change back, and the text pops down a little. I thought I'd try and replicate it because, you know, eff yeah hovers.

Demo…

SVG Patterns Gallery

Using SVG for background patterns is great because they 1) are very small 2) are vector, thus crisp at any screen resolution and 3) work in IE 9 (unlike gradients). Gallery by Philip Rogers.…

20 comments

Poll Wrapup: How Much Effort Do People Put Into Alt Text?

From over 16,000 people surveyed, more than half (54%) say they "do some" when it comes to alt text for images that are important to content. The example provided did provide insight into the content and relevance of the image.

Thankfully the least number of people (10%) said they "do nothing." This is unfortunate as it is a a real accessibility problem. …

The State of Spinners

If you need to indicate "please wait, something is happening" on a website, a spinner has long been the go-to choice. Probably an animated GIF, although there are other options like CSS animations, apng, SVG, or canvas. James Padolsey goes through each of the possibly options and explains the good and bad as well as introduces a cool new tool.…

68 comments

Slide In (as you scroll down) Boxes

I was playing with my new Nexus 7 (I really wanted to own a real Android device) and I noticed a neat little effect in the Google+ app that comes with it. As you swipe down, new modules of content slide up into place. Video is best here:…