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Fighting FOIT and FOUT Together

Lots from Divya with the setup:

There are 2 kinds of problems that can arise when using webfonts; Flash of invisible text (FOIT) and Flash of Unstyled Text (FOUT) ... If we were to compare them, FOUT is of course the lesser of the two evils

If you wanna fight FOIT, the easiest tool is the font-display CSS property. I like the optional value because I generally dislike the look of fonts swapping.… Read article

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Google Fonts and font-display

The font-display descriptor in @font-face blocks is really great. It goes a long way, all by itself, for improving the perceived performance of web font loading. Loading web fonts is tricky stuff and having a tool like this that works as well as it does is a big deal for the web.

It's such a big deal that Google's own Pagespeed Insights / Lighthouse will ding you for not using it. A cruel irony, as their own Google Fonts (easily … Read article

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Ease-y Breezy: A Primer on Easing Functions

During the past few months, I’ve been actively teaching myself how to draw and animate SVG shapes. I’ve been using CSS transitions, as well as tools like D3.js, react-motion and GSAP, to create my animations.

One thing about animations in general and the documentation these and other animation tools recommend is using easing functions. I’ve been working with them in some capacity over the years, but to be honest, I would never know which function to choose … Read article

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How to Worry About npm Package Weight

It's all too easy to go crazy with the imports and end up with megabytes upon megabytes of JavaScript. It can be a problem as that weight burdens each and every visitor from our site, very possibly delaying or stopping them from doing what they came to do on the site. Bad for them, worse for you.

There is all sorts of ways to keep an eye on it.… Read article

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Nobody is quite wrong.

There are two opposing views on using non-polyfillable new web features that I find are both equally common in our industry:

  1. Websites don't need to look the same in every browser. The concept of progressive enhancement helps with that. There are tools, even native language features, that help with this.
  2. If browser support isn't where I want it to be, it's just exotic eye candy for demos and not to be used.

I'm not sure I'd say either one of … Read article

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A CSS Venn Diagram

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Reversing an Easing Curve

Let’s take a look at a carousel I worked on where items slide in and out of view with CSS animations. To get each item to slide in and out of view nicely I used a cubic-bezier for the animation-timing-function property, instead of using a standard easing keyword.… Read article

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Annotated Build Processes

When you're putting together a build process for a site, it's so dang useful to look at other people's processes. I ran across Andrew Welch's "An Annotated webpack 4 Config for Frontend Web Development" the other day and was glad he blogged it. If I was kicking off a new site where I wanted a webpack build, then I'd almost certainly reference something like this rather than start from scratch. At the same time, it made me realize how build … Read article

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Making SVG icon libraries for React apps

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Two Ways to Build a Site That Seem Super Different But Weirdly Aren’t That Different

Here are two ways to build a site (abstractly) that feel diametrically opposed to me:

  1. Build a site as an SPA (Single Page App). The page loads a skeleton HTML page that executes JavaScript as quickly as it can. The JavaScript calls an API to get data, and then the page renders content. Navigation of the site is more API calls to get the data it needs and re-rendering.
  2. Build a site as statically-generated. A build process runs in which
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