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Developers and Designers 

Excerpt from a Andrew Norcross article on how designers and developers might understand each other (and thus work together) better:

If you remember nothing else about developers, remember this: our core nature is to streamline, automate, and basically reduce things to their smallest possible element. This ethos drives almost every decision a developer makes.

I like how Tim Brown linked to the article:

Developers are your prepress folks.

Before I was in web, I was prepress for many years. I think there is a ton of overlap between the jobs. One takes designs and gets them ready for print. One takes designs and gets them ready for the web.

What a CSS Code Review Might Look Like

Many programming languages go through a code review before deployment. Whether it's a quick once-over, in-depth peer review, or complete unit testing, code reviews help us release code into the wild with confidence.

I started to imagine what a CSS code review might look like. CSS can be written in a number of ways, and the best way is often subjective to the project. I'm definitely not trying to get dogmatic with a post like this, but instead lay the …

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Native CSS Scroll Snap Points 

The newly-introduced CSS “snap points” properties could make it a whole lot easier to create CSS-only scroll effects (once browser support catches up). This post from Sergey Gospodarets' blog includes demos of snappy scrolling for image galleries and full-page vertical scrolling.

Scroll snapping is used widely for a better separation of the provided content (vertical full height pages) or, for example, to emulate galleries behavior... Can you imagine how easy would be creating such effects using CSS only?

The full specification is worth a review.

Working with Shapes in Web Design

When we make a new component on a website, we’re effectively creating rectangles of different sizes, whether we realise it or not. But what happens if we want to experiment a little? How many different ways are there to make shapes?

In this post I want to roughly outline some of the most common ways to make circles, triangles, and polygons, as well jot down the advantages and disadvantages for these methods so we can experiment with those that might …

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HTTP 203: Progressive loading 

The latest episode from HTTP 203, a series of talks about front-end development with Paul Lewis and Jake Archibald, takes a look at progressively loading assets.

Jake makes the comparison between websites and the way that video games will let users download and play the first level instead of forcing them to wait for the all the assets to finish downloading. What does your level one website look like?

#139: Explaining the Server Side Mustard Cut

I published a written post about this idea of the Server Side Mustard Cut. So if you're into reading and checking out code samples and stuff, that's the place for you. In this video I just walk through all that, explaining myself as we go.

I'll give the same caveat I have everywhere else I've introduced this: this may not be perfect for every site out there. In fact I think normal RWD stuff is generally better, up to …

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