caret-color

The caret-color property in CSS changes the color of the cursor (caret) in inputs, texareas, or really any element that is editable, like <div contenteditable></div>.

input,
textarea,
[contenteditable] {
  caret-color: red;
}

The color of the caret generally matches the color of the text, but this property allows you to change those independently.

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Using Custom Properties to Modify Components

Instead of using custom properties to style whole portions of a website’s interface I think we should use them to customize and modify tiny components. Here’s why.

Whenever anyone mentions CSS custom properties they often talk about the ability to theme a website’s interface in one fell swoop. For example, if you’re working at somewhere like a big news org then we might want to specify a distinct visual design for the Finance section and the Sports section – buttons, headers, pull quotes and text color could all change on the fly.

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Saving SVG with Space Around It from Illustrator

There are a number of ways to export graphics from Illustrator. Some of them aren't particulary useful (Save As), some of them don't support SVG (Export for Web), some of them produce good output but have limited options that don't allow preserving space around the art (Export As). The only way to output SVG preserving the space around the art is export the artboard itself, which is only an option under the Export for Screens area.

Visual Email Builder Apps

I bet y'all know that apps like Campaign Monitor and MailChimp have visual email builders built right into them. You drag and drop different types of content right into a layout. You edit text right within the email. It's nice. It's a lot nicer than editing the quagmire of HTML underneath, anyway!

But not everybody needs all the rest of the features that those apps bring, like list management and the actual sending of the email. Perhaps you have an app that already handles that kind of thing. You just need to design some emails, get the final HTML, and use it in your own app.

When I was looking around at email tooling, I was surprised there were a good number of apps that help just with the visual email building. Very cool.

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Using the Paint Timing API

It's a great time to be a web performance aficionado, and the arrival of the Paint Timing API in Chrome 60 is proof positive of that fact. The Paint Timing API is yet another addition to the burgeoning Performance API, but instead of capturing page and resource timings, this new and experimental API allows you to capture metrics on when a page begins painting.

If you haven't experimented with any of the various performance APIs, it may help if you brush up a bit on them, as the syntax of this API has much in common with those APIs (particularly the Resource Timing API). That said, you can read on and get something out of this article even if you don't. Before we dive in, however, let's talk about painting and the specific timings this API collects.

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(An Interview About) imgix Page Weight

Imgix has been a long-time display ad sponsor here on CSS-Tricks. This post is not technically sponsored, I just noticed that they released a tool for analyzing image performance at any given URL that is pretty interesting.

We know web performance is a big deal. We know that images are perhaps the largest offender in ballooning page weights across the web. We know we have tools for looking at page performance as a whole. It seems fairly new to me to have tools for specifically analyzing and demonstrating how we could have done better with images specifically. That's what this Page Weight tool is.

Clearly this is a marketing tool for them. You put in a URL, and it tells you how you could have done better, and specifically how imgix can help do that. I'm generally a fan of that. Tools with businesses behind them have the resources and motivation to stick around and get better. But as ever, something to be aware of.

I asked Brit Morgan some questions about it.

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Using ES2017 Async Functions

ES2017 was finalized in June, and with it came wide support for my new favorite JavaScript feature: async functions! If you've ever struggled with reasoning about asynchronous JavaScript, this is for you. If you haven't, then, well, you're probably a super-genius.

Async functions more or less let you write sequenced JavaScript code, without wrapping all your logic in callbacks, generators, or promises. (more…)

More CSS Charts, with Grid & Custom Properties

I loved Robin's recent post, experimenting with CSS Grid for bar-charts. I've actually been using a similar approach on a client project, building a day-planner with CSS Grid. It's a different use-case, but the same basic technique: using grid layouts to visualize data.

(I recommend reading Robin's article first, since I'm building on top of his chart.)

Robin's approach relies on a large Sass loop to generate 100 potential class-names, even though less than 12 are used in the final chart. In production we'll want something more direct and performant, with better semantics, so I turned to definition lists and CSS Variables (aka Custom Properties) to build my charts.

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Improving Conversations using the Perspective API

I recently came across an article by Rory Cellan-Jones about a new technology from Jigsaw, a development group at Google focused on making people safer online through technology. At the time they'd just released the first alpha version of what they call The Perspective API. It's a machine learning tool that is designed to rate a string of text (i.e. a comment) and provide you with a Toxicity Score, a number representing how toxic the text is.

The system learns by seeing how thousands of online conversations have been moderated and then scores new comments by assessing how "toxic" they are and whether similar language had led other people to leave conversations. What it's doing is trying to improve the quality of debate and make sure people aren't put off from joining in.

As the project is still in its infancy it doesn't do much more than that. Still, we can use it!

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