Grow your CSS skills. Land your dream job.

Who uses LAMP, who uses XAMPP?

  • # May 23, 2013 at 1:01 pm

    I use LAMP becuase it’s just what I’m used to. However, I’m wondering if there’s any benefit to using XAMPP.

    My understanding is that XAMPP is a bundle with additional features (possibly ones I don’t need) and the database by default has no security whatsoever. So… I guess it would be easy to develop on because there’s no password.

    Tell everyone what you use and why!

    For the purposes of this discussion MAMP = WAMP = LAMP. So, it’s basically XAMPP vs. The Field.

    # May 23, 2013 at 1:30 pm

    Does the presence or absence of a password make development easier?

    I installed each component separately on my Windows machine, and via apt-get on linux. I didn’t find it particularly complicated, but the Windows installation was a few years ago now (and has been running perfectly since).

    If the aim is to get a server up and running for development, just choose the installation method you prefer.

    # May 23, 2013 at 3:28 pm

    I don’t think it makes it drastically easier. Hence the reason I haven’t switched. If there was some other quantifiable benefit, I would consider.

    I’m more interrested in a tally. This may seem trivial, but I’d like to know how relatively popular Xampp is.

    # May 23, 2013 at 6:32 pm

    @Joe_Temp When i am not using the php/IIS plugin i totally use XAMPP. Reason being, easy as butter to install, never have problems with it, super fast and config and mysql is super easy to manage (as i am sure others are as well). It has just been my experience that XAMPP is a lot smoother.

    # May 23, 2013 at 8:28 pm

    I’ve actually been using neither over the past 12 months since my new computer, and doing all my dev work online. Has been so much more efficient for me.

    # May 23, 2013 at 8:55 pm

    I’m using XAMPP most of the time since I created WordPress themes.
    I haven’t tried LAMP yet.

    I remembered that it didn’t work because it was conflicted with the new update of Skype. It took a bit of time for me to find out that they’re in conflict. Read this article:

    http://www.knowledgesutra.com/discuss/fflpci-skype-xampp-port-conflict-overcome.html

    # May 24, 2013 at 12:26 am

    @audeemirza How weird. Luckily I do not have Skype on my Linux config and with newer versions of LAMP, there’s no opening of ports. Used to be 81 I believe. However, on last install, I opened nothing and everything runs fine.

    # May 24, 2013 at 12:38 am

    > I use LAMP becuase it’s just what I’m used to. However, I’m wondering if there’s any benefit to using XAMPP.

    `LAMP` is an acronym -`Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP` – not a specific package (unless you’re referring to a specific package – which one?). `XAMPP` is the name of one such specific LAMP package, by [Apache Friends](http://www.apachefriends.org/en/xampp.html).

    Are you asking about using XAMPP (specifically), or a package like XAMPP (something preconfigured, with an installer), vs. setting up each component yourself?

    *****
    That last sentence pretty well sums up my answer, by the way. What do you want? Something easy to install, without having to know too much about it? Go with XAMPP. In most cases, for development work on a local machine, it’s perfectly suited. I still run XAMPP on my desktop (though I’ve modified its original setup quite a bit), simply because I installed it years ago and never had a reason to ditch it.

    If you’re running a production server, though, here’s something to consider: **you need to know what you’re doing**. If you’re not comfortable enough with Apache [et.al] that doing it yourself isn’t actually *more convenient*, then you should probably think twice about doing it at all.

    # May 24, 2013 at 12:50 am

    I do know what LAMP stands for and I know it’s not a package because I individually installed each one via Terminal.

    Also, I only use my config for local testing.

    I guess my question should be rephrased in two parts: A: If installing LAMP only takes 5 minutes, why use a package? B: If not ease, what compelling benefit does XAMPP offer?

    I only ask because it seems like every programming book I’ve read lately recommends XAMPP. Why?

    # May 24, 2013 at 3:04 am

    I always download XAMPP since it was the first one I used, and was very easy to get started with and start writing scripts and what not. I used WAMP once too, and they basically do the same thing. One thing I liked about WAMP though was how easy it was to switch between PHP versions. At the time, Drupal didn’t work well with the current version of PHP so I had to use an older version and thought the PHP switch was cool. Now for Drupal development I use Acquia Dev Desktop exclusively, and Xampp for playing around with other stuff.

    # May 24, 2013 at 12:49 pm

    > I only ask because it seems like every programming book I’ve read lately recommends XAMPP. Why?

    Since the packages are designed to be easier to install, users are less likely to get something wrong. As the authors depend on, but don’t teach, that technology, it’s sound advice.

    > If installing LAMP only takes 5 minutes, why use a package?

    Peace of mind? Time saving? Not everyone wants to look up all the different package names. I gather in Windows some people have difficulty. If so, then packages are useful. I feel like you’re looking for something special about these packages that simply doesn’t exist. They are just an alternative way of installing and managing the same software.

    # May 24, 2013 at 4:38 pm

    > … you’re looking for something special about these packages that simply doesn’t exist. They are just an alternative way of installing and managing the same software.

    This.

    # May 25, 2013 at 12:17 am

    > I do know what LAMP stands for and I know it’s not a package because I individually installed each one via Terminal.

    I hope you didn’t interpret my comment as derogatory. It was certainly not meant to be. I wanted to clear up the ambiguity in your original post – it just didn’t quite make sense to talk about “LAMP” vs. “XAMPP” when XAMPP *is an implementation of* the LAMP stack.

    This sort of vague misunderstanding is widespread. Even assuming *you* understood it, there are almost certainly readers/contributors to this conversation that misinterpreted it.

    > what compelling benefit does XAMPP offer?
    I only ask because it seems like every programming book I’ve read lately recommends XAMPP. Why?

    .

    >> Since the packages are designed to be easier to install, users are less likely to get something wrong. As the authors depend on, but don’t teach, that technology, it’s sound advice.

    This.

    > … you’re looking for something special about these packages that simply doesn’t exist. They are just an alternative way of installing and managing the same software.

    and that too. : )

    # June 29, 2013 at 12:00 am

    I guess the whole reason I started this is because LAMP works fine for me… most of the time.

    It’s really weird… I’ll have like 5 test sites in my localhost directory that work fine and then, I’ll try to add another and BOOM! Suddenly I don’t have access to that folder. It’s really weird. It’s almost like Linux is selectively restricting access based on the names of my test sites. I’m sure there is a logical explanation but I can’t figure it out.

    @traq and @AlenAbdula seem to be quite skilled with Linux… what’s going on here? Should I just eliminate the headache and go with XAMPP?

    # June 29, 2013 at 1:11 am

    Where is your web root? Who is creating the new files/folders (you, root, apache)? Might be a user/permissions issue.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 20 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

*May or may not contain any actual "CSS" or "Tricks".