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TypeKit vs Google Web Fonts

  • # April 23, 2013 at 12:55 pm

    @joshwhite Can you elaborate?

    # April 23, 2013 at 6:37 pm

    I don’t consider stock photos an out of pocket expense. It’s something that the client and I will arrange before any project starts. It’s pretty common for me to talk to them about what kind of artwork they have, what artwork we’ll need and come to an arrangement. On larger projects where the company does a lot of marketing of their own I typically recommend that they purchase the artwork so they have the license to use it any other way they want. I definitely won’t just leave it out there open for interpretation :)

    Even if you use a monthly subscription for stock photos, art and vectors, you should be building in those costs into your rates or pricing somehow. It’s no different than a plumber building the cost of pipes, flux and propane into their bid.

    # April 23, 2013 at 10:02 pm

    What I mean by “paying out of pocket” is where someone purchases the font/webfont or subscription without factoring it into the cost of the project where the client will ultimately be paying for it.

    But I don’t think it’s that simple. Not all webfont/font distributors value the product at the same price or have the same licensing terms. Therefore, I think it would be impossible (and maybe even unfair) to implement them into a rate. Adding it to the cost of the project seems more logical.

    # April 25, 2013 at 12:32 am

    > Therefore, I think it would be impossible (and maybe even unfair) to implement them into a rate. Adding it to the cost of the project seems more logical.

    I think in the end it would be the same thing.

    I don’t do anything by an hourly rate (it’s all project / value based), but I do base most of my pricing on an hourly rate so I know in the end what it’s all anchored on.

    # April 25, 2013 at 2:35 am

    I don’t think web font subscriptions and a one off cost for stock photos as the same. Hitting up a client for a one off payment for something is easily done, but asking them to fork out for an ongoing subscription for a font…? For bigger companies maybe, for small to medium sized businesses forget about it.

    # April 25, 2013 at 10:10 am

    @chrisburton, I’ve been meaning to ask you about this for a little bit. When using TypeKit, how do you bill the client? Do you treat it as them “contributing” to your annual cost for _your_ subscription? Or do you set them up with a subscription of their own? The reason I ask is I recently picked up the portfolio package from typekit, because, as you’ve been saying, it’s a reasonable price for the font selection/quality it gives you. I’m just weary on how I’ll bill it.

    # April 25, 2013 at 12:44 pm

    I don’t do anything by an hourly rate (it’s all project / value based), but I do base most of my pricing on an hourly rate so I know in the end what it’s all anchored on. – @joshwhite

    That’s exactly how I do it.

    but asking them to fork out for an ongoing subscription for a font…? For bigger companies maybe, for small to medium sized businesses forget about it. – @deeve007

    They do it all the time. Why would you think medium to small businesses won’t pay for a subscription service?

    When using TypeKit, how do you bill the client? – @ChrisP

    Oh, gosh. There’s many factors to this and not all clients require the same things.

    With Typekit, I always set them up for their own subscription. This is because it’s less of a hassle to transfer if they ever hire someone in the future to manage their kit. Additionally, I don’t want them to have access to my account either if they ever decide to start changing things around. Also, sometimes clients ask for selections and then want their in-house managers/designers to take over.

    I bill the client based on what it costs me to do the project (nothing is gained here). FYI, I’m not talking about the price of the subscription plan. And then I factor in the profit.

    If you’re a web designer that’s looking for a proper way to price, here’s a great article on the subject. http://designpro.co/journal/67/project-pricing-with-respect-to-value

    # April 25, 2013 at 12:50 pm

    >I don’t do anything by an hourly rate (it’s all project / value based), but I do base most of my pricing on an hourly rate so I know in the end what it’s all anchored on. – @joshwhite

    >That’s exactly how I do it.

    @chrisburton, @johswhite

    could you guys elaborate? I am interested on how you guys come up with costs that’s not hourly, but based on hourly ‘?’

    # April 25, 2013 at 12:53 pm

    @chrisburton, it was less of a question about a proper way to price to a client, and more of a question of how _you_ handle TypeKit for an end user. It’s a brand new service to me, and I’ve noticed you mention it quite a bit, so I wanted your feedback as to how you handle it. You definitely answered my question though. Thanks :)

    # April 25, 2013 at 12:57 pm

    @ChrisP Ah, my apologies. Are you sure I answered your questions?

    @cwork See article I posted.

    # April 25, 2013 at 1:03 pm

    @chrisburton, yes

    > With Typekit, I always set them up for their own subscription. This is because it’s less of a hassle to transfer if they ever hire someone in the future to manage their kit. Additionally, I don’t want them to have access to my account either if they ever decide to start changing things around. Also, sometimes clients ask for selections and then want their in-house managers/designers to take over.

    That answered it. I wasn’t sure if you included a “contribution” to your overall annual subscription to TypeKit, or if you did as you mentioned, and just set the client up with their own TypeKit account.

    I purchased the Portfolio package because it was fairly priced, included the entire font collection, and had _plenty_ of page views included into the package. I wasn’t sure if I should be using my plan for customers, or set customers up with their own TypeKit plan.

    # April 25, 2013 at 1:12 pm

    @ChrisP Yeah, I think it’s smarter and makes sense for the client to have their own plan for reasons I mentioned above.

    # April 25, 2013 at 1:40 pm

    @chrisburton, ha. i jumped the gun a bit, didn’t see the article. thanks!

    # April 25, 2013 at 2:30 pm

    >>They do it all the time. Why would you think medium to small businesses won’t pay for a subscription service?

    Many also don’t do it all the time. I’m pretty comfortable with my costing, I’ve been doing this long enough. ;)

    # April 25, 2013 at 2:35 pm

    @deeve007

    Many also don’t do it all the time.

    What do you offer your small/medium business clients since you feel a subscription service is not for them? Google webfonts?

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