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[Solved] IE6 Not Linking Links in one Div

  • # September 26, 2009 at 3:15 pm

    I’m not entirely sure it’s a CSS issue, but it’s the only thing I can think of. I’ve never encountered anything like this before.

    I have a footer on my page that is stuck to the bottom using "Sticky Footer" code (http://www.cssstickyfooter.com/). Inside that div (#footer), I have two other divs. The top div (.horizline) contains the name/address and two social media icons. Those icons are linked to their respective networks. The bottom div (#under_body) contains the links to get into the backend and to login.

    The problem is that in IE6, none of the links are linked. I’m not sure how to explain it better. You hover over them and nothing. You click on them and nothing. They don’t do anything to identify themselves as links. But, in the source code they are a href’d. But neither the text links nor the image links work.

    All the other links on the page work, and this only happens in IE6 (IE7 is fine).

    It’s on a Joomla 1.5.14 site, and there are no 3rd party extensions operating on anything in the footer.

    Here’s the site: http://www.spinninginfinity.net/alcf
    user/pass: alcf/alcf

    Thanks for looking at it!
    :?

    # September 27, 2009 at 12:43 am

    throw in a javascript message that says you are using an outdated browser if it’s i.e 6. Just tell them to upgade

    # September 27, 2009 at 1:47 am
    "cybershot" wrote:
    throw in a javascript message that says you are using an outdated browser if it’s i.e 6. Just tell them to upgade

    …and the "Worst Advice of the Day Award" goes to…

    That is a very interesting problem. I’m not sure it’s really a CSS issue, but like you said, I can’t particularly pinpoint what else it would be. There’s one tiny little error, but I doubt it’s causing this issue:

    Remove <ul class="menu_usermenu" /> and see if that helps anything.

    # September 27, 2009 at 1:48 am
    "TheDoc" wrote:
    "cybershot" wrote:
    throw in a javascript message that says you are using an outdated browser if it’s i.e 6. Just tell them to upgade

    …and the "Worst Advice of the Day Award" goes to…

    and jackass of the day goes to.

    # September 27, 2009 at 1:56 am
    "cybershot" wrote:
    and jackass of the day goes to.

    …and hilarity ensues. Most people would choose to defend the advice that they gave, but how could I be so silly, how could you possibly defend giving that advice.

    Alienating IE6 users is one of the most shortsighted, ignorant things you could suggest somebody do. Creating a site with broken functionality for 15% (if not more) of your users is ludicrous. It’s the lazy way out. Encourage people to upgrade all you want, but some users are simply stuck with IE6 and there’s nothing they can do about it. Remind them that there are new versions of things, but don’t provide them with a broken website.

    # September 27, 2009 at 2:07 am

    Yes, I can see your point, but isn’t that a huge opinion that you are making. To say that it is lazy again is just an opinion. I can see the need for cross browser support. I have seen others that have put scripts into their sites that say that the site doesn’t do well in I.e 6. I have seen sites just recently with that. To me in all the time I have seen issues with I.E 6, half say they don’t support it anymore and the other half say what you say. It goes back and forth. It’s like a never ending debate. Hasn’t chris done polls on this very thing in the past?

    # September 27, 2009 at 2:41 am

    well, I did some checking and I found that if I delete line 156 which for me is

    <div id="footer">

    Then the links start to work.

    # September 27, 2009 at 1:55 pm

    I completely agree that some sites don’t need to support IE6, it’s all about your consumer base.

    w3schools is still getting 13% IE6 userbase. Now, you could probably assume that it’s really only tech savvy people going to that site. So if they are still in the 13% range, one can only imagine what the rest of the normal population are using.

    Now bringing this all around to this topic and tying it in a neat bow, an answer to somebody can never be "don’t support ie6". It sure is simple to say, but can have huge ramifications for somebody. What if their userbase is 50% IE6? Like I said, it all comes down to the specific site and audience it’s being designed for.

    Back to the matter at hand! Cybershot is on the right path I think. Serious divitis suffering in there. A total of seven divs make up the footer. One is even called "footer padding" which you can just put directly onto the #footer div itself.

    # September 27, 2009 at 3:29 pm

    Thanks for the suggestions. I’ll try working on them and report back.

    The IE6 debate. Yeah, I’d be happy if I could just code for, well, anything but IE6. However, I find that working with churches there is a higher than normal percentage of IE6 users. Whether it’s someone’s grandma who inherited her computer 4-5 years ago when her grandson got a new one, or a church that doesn’t have the budget (or is unwilling to spend it) to buy a new system, IE6 is a fact of life. I’m trying to make something that works in 6, but focusing the design on FF. And, in this case, the church is running IE6 in their office, so when I meet with them it has to work.

    About the divitis. :oops: Yeah, I probably overdid it. I started using "padding_xxx" divs for all my padding so IE6 wouldn’t flip out with the box model in layouts. I just keep using it by default. I’ll have to try changing that mindset!

    I can’t take out the div id="footer" as that’s integral to the sticky footer. However, maybe if I pull out some of those extraneous div’s it’ll work better. And, I suppose that I could skip the sticky footer if necessary, or pull it out in an IE6 conditional stylesheet.

    Again, thanks for your help!

    # September 27, 2009 at 4:09 pm

    Point taken Doc

    # September 27, 2009 at 5:54 pm

    I started deleting styles one by one with no effect until I got to "background". Then it worked just fine. Turns out the png background had an alpha transparency channel, and that freaked out IE6. So, I changed it to a .gif and called it on a conditional stylesheet.

    Working fine just now. :D

    Thanks again for your help!

    # September 28, 2009 at 12:51 am

    Tad bit off topic, but I had to design for a non-profit recently whose next to largest browser market share was IE 5. Yes, you heard it, IE 5.

    I still shake when I think about it.

    Though, with the larger ensuing upgrade paths to Vista and 7. You can expect that the amount of IE 6 users will dwindle below 10% before the end of the first quarter of next year. That’s my guess.

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