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Should I use MAMP instead of normal host?

  • # December 17, 2012 at 5:38 pm

    I’m doing a tutorial for how to build a custom theme in WordPres. Tutorial uses MAMP. I never have.
    Is this in place of using a host? (so it’s a local host)
    If so, I can upload the files online, via MAMP?
    Down the road, when client owns site, he/she can use my MAMP to make changes? Or they need own host?
    You don’t use FTP with MAMP?
    Finally, is it better to use MAMP? I’m more familiar with FTP and host, but if it’s better, I’ll try it.

    …thanks in advance. I googled MAMP and just got more confused.

    # December 17, 2012 at 5:44 pm

    Mamp is a local host that is setup on your own computer. It is mainly used for development stages not ready to publish. You can take the files in Mamp and upload them onto your online server (with changes to the database most likely). However, no one can access your site but you. So no one would be able to see it.

    # December 17, 2012 at 5:46 pm

    MAMP (also XAMPP and WAMP) is a server package enabling you to build sites locally. You will still need to upload it to a server when going live, but it saves you from having to do so before you get to that stage.

    For WordPress developers, this simply means that they can run PHP on their local machine (PHP is traditionally a server-side language).

    # December 17, 2012 at 5:47 pm

    MAMP stands for Mac Apache MySql PHP, this is needed if you want to run a PHP script on your local computer, not online. It creates a local server for development, and can’t be used (AFAIK, someone correct me if I’m wrong) on a real website online.

    All this is only true if you have a Mac, for Windows the equivalent would be WAMP (there are lots of others out there, but I don’t want to confuse you).

    As for the questions regarding FTP, you’d still need to use it to put your files on the web, and I don’t think that MAMP can take care of that.

    # December 17, 2012 at 5:49 pm

    Ah, that was fast feedback! CSS Tricks forumers are awesome!

    It sounds to me like it’s not worth the effort. I’ll stick with what I know: The client wants to make his own changes later.

    Besides, I don’t mind waiting 5 seconds to upload files :)

    Thanks so much!

    # December 17, 2012 at 5:53 pm

    If you have multiple big changes, you wouldn’t want to push it online without testing and potentially break the site, therefore testing locally before going live is a great idea

    # December 17, 2012 at 8:37 pm

    Hi tigerpaw, you should definitely give MAMP a try. It’s a great app for building and testing sites, especially those built with wordpress.

    If my two sentences don’t spur you on I reckon I know a man who can

    http://css-tricks.com/video-screencasts/87-moving-up-with-mamp/

    # December 17, 2012 at 9:03 pm

    @soren She’s asking if she can use Mamp as a local hosting platform for an online site. It’s not possible.

    # December 17, 2012 at 9:57 pm

    It actually is *possible*, but certainly not *advisable*.

    > The philosophy behind XAMPP is to build an easy to install distribution [...] make it convenient for developers XAMPP is configured with all features turned on.

    > **The default configuration is not good from a securtiy point of view and it’s not secure enough for a production environment** – please don’t use XAMPP in such environment.

    > *– http://www.apachefriends.org/en/xampp.html*

    > *[emphasis added]*

    # December 17, 2012 at 10:53 pm

    @traq You would need your own server, correct?

    # December 17, 2012 at 10:55 pm

    @chrisburton Considering that you are technically turning your local machine into a server, I think that @traq is saying it wouldn’t be a good idea to make it publicly accessible as the lack of security would be a major concern.

    # December 17, 2012 at 11:01 pm

    @traq @joshuanhiibert I think I misread. I took it as you install it onto a server. My fault.

    # December 18, 2012 at 12:01 am

    @joshuanhibbert correct.

    xampp is nothing more than an “installer” (so to speak) that contains Apache, PHP, MySQL, and (in most cases) a slew of other cool web-stuff.

    Beyond security, there are also the issues of nameservers, bandwidth (upstream – which would suddenly be *downstream* if you were serving content- is typically much slower than downstream for home/small business), and a bunch of other things, not the least of which is having to keep your computer running 24/365.

    # December 18, 2012 at 11:28 am

    @chrisburton Sorry, Chris. From tigerpaw’s post I thought she meant she was confused by MAMP in general and the reasons for using it.

    # December 18, 2012 at 11:45 am

    @soren hey, that’s quite all right.

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