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Question about Images

  • # May 27, 2013 at 3:38 am

    I’m working on a static page project that has about 19 domains (each acting like an individual website) that has a lot of images. The client intends to get a one month Shutter stock membership (I think its at $249) which will enable us to download 25 images per day – more than enough for the current project.

    The problem is – the client will purchase the membership after the entire project (all domains) are completed, where the only thing that will remain is to replace the dummy images (downloaded from Google) with the Shutter Stock images.

    This would mean that the Google images will remain on our server for a significant amount of time. Will this be trouble? How do we know what images can be used without
    repercussions ?

    # May 27, 2013 at 4:07 am

    Why not use [Lorem-pixel](http://lorempixel.com/) if it just dummy holder at the moment.

    As a side note Shutter stock isn’t really supposed to used to get the maximum number of images possible and 700 images is way overkill [in my opinion] if your client has a need for so many image hiring a professional to get originals would be far more cost effective in the long run! (sorry for the little rant) ….

    # May 27, 2013 at 4:30 am

    Thanks for your response, unasAquila. I’m using google images since the client wants to know how the domains would look, with images and all. The primary concern seems to be how the domains look, how the content is presented, and navigation.

    > As a side note Shutter stock isn’t really supposed to used to get the maximum number of images possible

    What do you mean by this? It’s certainly allowed, is it not?

    Actually, I think it’s far more cost effective going this route since for a large number of images, images on demand turn out to be more expensive. (19 domains, each having about 25-30 pages, each page having many sub-pages).

    P.S : The client is also having quite a say in how the pages should look, so I’m almost simply following instructions. I’m not sure how you guys handle such scenarios.

    # May 27, 2013 at 4:54 am

    I would _really_ advice against using google images and go with more legal images, such as the [Lorempixel](http://lorempixel.com/) mentioned above, [Placehold.it](http://placehold.it) or [Placekitten](http://placekitten.com), since you are unlikely to be allowed to keep the pictures downloaded from Google legally.

    However, the best way to find out whether you can legally use them is to go to each site they’re from and see if they have any licence.

    # May 27, 2013 at 5:06 am

    you can do an advanced search on flickr and have it display photos under the creative commons licence.
    higher quality but they do need a link back

    # May 27, 2013 at 5:07 am

    It’s not against the ToS, but i look at the people who put the work in and the amount they get paid.
    For example your client gets 700 images at the monthly cost of 249$ that’s 0.35$ per image the average user may uses 5 – 10 maybe a month which at (10 pm) would be 24.90$ each (assuming that the photographer get 100% [which they don't]) but that’s is on your clients conscience.

    As to Lorem Pixel it has millions of images which can be used as place holders much like lorem ipsum.

    you would use it like -

    where `400` is the width and `200` is the height `nature` can also be people, sports, transport and so on. the last parameter is if you want the same image at all times if not leave it off for a random image each time the page is loaded.

    # May 27, 2013 at 3:33 pm

    > The problem is – the client will purchase the membership after the entire project (all domains) are completed, where the only thing that will remain is to replace the dummy images (downloaded from Google) with the Shutter Stock images.

    I would also be wary of this plan. Even if your client’s intent is sincere, there’s a big chance that they’ll “forget” about it, or the project’s budget will be cut, or they might even decide that it’s “just fine” to keep the temp images once it’s time to buy. Not to mention the fact that there’s no reason they can’t be sued in the meantime.

    There is absolutely **no reason** not to buy the final images beforehand anyway. You’re talking about doubling the amount of work you’re doing for no benefit.

    This shouldn’t even be a matter of controversy. “I will not use any content without clear rights to use.” Plain and simple. Keep in mind that, if anything goes wrong, *you* would be carrying more liability then they would (because you’re the one *doing* it), and there’s every opportunity for the blame to shift *entirely* to you if your client were faced with legal action.

    # May 27, 2013 at 3:47 pm

    What @traq said. +100.

    Rework the contract and have the client sign off on using these temp. images.

    I’m a [wedding photographer](http://500px.com/alenabdula) and you’ll be suprised how many clients use illegal images and their first excuse is “My web designer did it”!

    Just be cautious.

    # May 27, 2013 at 11:51 pm

    Thank you everyone for these valuable inputs. Never realized I was walking on thin ice with my actions. I’m going to try Lorempixel.

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