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javascript turned off?

  • # February 24, 2009 at 3:50 pm

    Hello folks,

    How do you determine if you want to include some javascript ( or jQuery, etc. ) in your website code?
    Aren’t you concerned that some people may have javascript turned off on their browsers?

    Cheers!

    # February 24, 2009 at 4:33 pm

    The people that have JS turned off are such a small minority most people overlook it. On top of that, the majority of people with it turned off assume they will come across bugs in websites (you generally won’t find non-tech savvy people with it turned off, as they wouldn’t really know how).

    If there are functions on the site that require JS, you can always include a simple reminder letting people know that JS is required for the site to function properly.

    W3 puts the number of users with JS turned off around 5%, and that’s amongst people that actually go to the W3 website. Realistically, that number will be even lower.

    # February 24, 2009 at 4:52 pm

    I think it also depends on what kind of site you are developing. Whether it’s a web 2.0 application, an online shop, a marketing tool, an informational site, etc…

    For instance, if you are selling outdoor activity holidays I think it safe to assume that anyone with Javascript turned off would be too paranoid to leave the house let alone buy one of your holidays. :lol:

    # February 25, 2009 at 10:48 am
    "TheDoc" wrote:
    The people that have JS turned off are such a small minority most people overlook it. On top of that, the majority of people with it turned off assume they will come across bugs in websites (you generally won’t find non-tech savvy people with it turned off, as they wouldn’t really know how).

    If there are functions on the site that require JS, you can always include a simple reminder letting people know that JS is required for the site to function properly.

    W3 puts the number of users with JS turned off around 5%, and that’s amongst people that actually go to the W3 website. Realistically, that number will be even lower.

    Thanks for the comments Doc!

    # February 25, 2009 at 10:49 am
    "davesgonebananas" wrote:
    For instance, if you are selling outdoor activity holidays I think it safe to assume that anyone with Javascript turned off would be too paranoid to leave the house let alone buy one of your holidays. :lol:

    You know what? That is funny! :lol:

    # February 28, 2009 at 4:32 am

    This is also where the idea of "progressive enhancement" comes in. Basically you design your site/app/sandwich without js to the best of your ability and then add in the bells and whistles of js – we also do this with css, it’s where the idea of semantic html comes in – what if people have css turned off or using a text-only browser?

    So you start with good, readable HTML. Style it to look and work good with css, images, etc. Finally sprinkle in a bit of javascript to take it to that next level of functionality, style, and usability.

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