Grow your CSS skills. Land your dream job.

Is the UX acceptable? Any critique would help!

  • # August 11, 2014 at 11:57 pm

    Display and text type are completely different (especially on the web).

    When you read closer you will see that this is what I was telling you all along, but until just now you were ignoring this.

    So only just now you write:

    Now, if you applied this to a display face or headline, I think we could agree with each other.

    Trying to backup? Please look in the mirror; but congratulations, after all this back and forth, you finally and reluctantly admit to your initial misinterpretation of “what I was trying to say”.

    Was it because of this next line in my first post in this thread?

    (like so in CSS : p { letter-spacing: 1px )

    I really have to think this was the only thing you read in that first post, for otherwise I really do not understand the sloppy and snarky first reply. Shocked? Never do I even mention the typeface used, nor do I intentionally or unintentionally trying to cover up the flaws of a webfont, because explaining these flaws would have been something for later in the conversation, but you took that upon yourself, except the explaining that is. So yeah, don’t forget we are trying to explain something to a beginner in webdesign here, there’s that. Better take your time for this, we’ve all been there.

    But you’re trying to back up what you consider improvements and or a solution with how FF Info (Display) was designed for signs.

    No, I am not “trying to back up” (Again: quite an arrogant assumption and misinterpretation of what it is that I try to write.) So yes I do see great similarities when in comes to how type is used (it’s role or function, if you will,) in ui-elements, for example site navigation, headlines, and type designed for signs. Sure there are differences too, how could there not be? And yes it has to do how screens are back-lighted and make light text on dark background look bolder than it really is, destroying the negative spaces between the glyphs, which can be helped (but not fixed) with a tiny amount of letter-spacing. To come closer to fixing this, one could use Dave Rupert’s lettering.js. You can hear him, @chriscoyier and Dan Mall talking about this subject here on the shoptalk podcast, and yes on 34:45 that is my question, and I also think Dan Mall “nailed” the answer. I could assume that you would disagree with him, but see, I don’t know, so I ask: would you ever use javascript to try to fix ‘letter-tracking’ which is off?

    It’s easy to misinterpret a mood or feeling when you can’t hear the person.

    All the more reason to take your time and explain what you are trying to convey, and read more carefully what someone else is trying to write (read it with the right context in mind). And if something is not clear to you, why not just ask? Why make assumptions based on a misinterpretation?

    # August 12, 2014 at 3:13 pm

    When you read closer you will see that this is what I was telling you all along, but until just now you were ignoring this.

    You were? You certainly have a funny way of explaining things with continuous disagreement if you’re now saying the above. Not to mention, what’s with the hostility and name-calling? As I explained to you already, my words were not coming from arrogance or negativity, that actually seems to be coming from you. Do I disagree with you on using text-shadow and letter-spacing on body text? Absolutely because the problem was the typeface used (and most likely the font size contributed — I’d have to look back) and your method was covering up the main problem as I’ve mentioned before.

    So only just now you write:
    Now, if you applied this to a display face or headline, I think we could agree with each other.
    Trying to backup? Please look in the mirror; but congratulations, after all this back and forth, you finally and reluctantly admit to your initial misinterpretation of “what I was trying to say”.

    Right.

    Was it because of this next line in my first post in this thread?
    (like so in CSS : p { letter-spacing: 1px )

    Nope. I actually saw your demo.

    You can hear him, @chriscoyier and Dan Mall talking about this subject here on the shoptalk podcast, and yes on 34:45 that is my question, and I also think Dan Mall “nailed” the answer. I could assume that you would disagree with him…

    Dave created lettering.js without UX in mind. Did you listen to the part where he’s now fixing this? Keep in mind that lettering.js was essentially made for Display or headline type and not kerning (or tracking) of body text.

    I’m done and moving on from this. You should too.

    # August 13, 2014 at 3:52 am

    You want to know why I come off as hostile when you give me this hypocritical question (see above):

    You were?

    And later spinning my position on text-shadow and letter-spacing to the opposite of what it is by this hypocritical question:

    Do I disagree with you on using text-shadow and letter-spacing on body text?

    I find this evil and disgusting, and yes things like this can drive me up the wall. When one reads what I wrote: already in my second post of this thread I write:

    and no, to be clear: I would not recommend large sections of body text set in white on dark background with letter-spacing and text-shadow

    How can you twist this, spinning it by suggesting I mean the opposite, and then start arguing that? It’s for all to see, but you don’t want to know, which would be funny if it wasn’t so sad: barking up the wrong tree, but I think you know it.

    The title of this post is: “Is the UX acceptable? Any critique would help” This makes the subject of this thread about the user experience of a website. Now in the context of “the-website-this-is-referring-to”, this becomes, at least in my mind, a question about the usability, and because of that, also readability of the user-interface. So then for you to keep on writing about body-text when there are no large sections of body text in sight (It’s all headings and user-interface elements) and this typeface which is obviously not the best one out there, is misplaced here. You don’t have to believe me, but I get it. Preoccupations, we al have them, and I’m sure you will get plenty of opportunities to give recommendations on this forum about body-text in relation to font choice. And you know what, I think that is fascinating too.

    Yes, I’m moving on too, not because you are telling me to, but because I have better things to do in life.

    # August 13, 2014 at 4:52 am

    @chrisburton and @Atelierbram Take it outside please guys :)

    Shouldn’t you guys be doing some web design rather than ranting and raving on this forum?

Viewing 4 posts - 16 through 19 (of 19 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

*May or may not contain any actual "CSS" or "Tricks".