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Freelance Lifestyle

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    # July 12, 2013 at 6:05 pm

    >My advice is: make sure you are ready to be a professional in your field. Be prepared to behave and learn like a professional. Engage your customers like a professional should. Provide customer service and use your expertise. Make people a LOT of money with your services. And if you are doing all that, then you are charging like a professional should and making a really good living making people successful.

    +1

    # July 12, 2013 at 6:26 pm

    > The only reason to go freelance in my opinion is because you have the specialized professional skills to pull it off and make a lot of money.

    -1

    Everything else +1

    # July 12, 2013 at 7:37 pm

    @AlenAbdula what is it that puts you off about that statement? Just curious about your perspective.

    I might clash a little bit just because of my semantics. Someone who just dabbles in web design on the side for extra money isn’t really freelancing in my opinion. To me that’s more of a hobbyist.

    # July 12, 2013 at 7:44 pm

    Unfortunately there are many hobbyists calling themselves “freelancet”, so you’re right it could be semantics.

    # July 12, 2013 at 8:03 pm

    > @AlenAbdula what is it that puts you off about that statement? Just curious about your perspective.

    I don’t agree with the “The only reason to go freelance” and “making a lot of money” part.

    There are a lot of motivating factors to go freelance, making a lot of money should not be one of them.

    # July 12, 2013 at 8:25 pm

    Freelancing or being self employed as independent contractor are entirely two different things. If you freelance you still most likely have to answer to some independent agency (employer) who gets jobs and acts as a middle man between you (who will do the work) and customer.

    If you are self employed independent contractor you’ll most likely deal with customer directly and the potential for reward is greater than that of freelancer.

    # July 12, 2013 at 8:28 pm

    I definitely understand your point there and overall I do agree with you.

    In this context however I think it was appropriate. Everything @elmsoftware mentioned was mostly financial based – revolving around the questions I agonized over. Could I feed my family? Could I make a living? Will I just make more working at another desk job?

    So I think in this particular instance it will primarily be motivated by the financial side.

    # July 12, 2013 at 8:38 pm

    There’s nothing wrong being motivated by the financial side of things at all. But what it eventually comes down to is this: Do what you love and money will follow. There’s nothing more satisfying in life then being able to make living from your hobby. As my grandpa once said many moons ago to me: Make living out of something what you love and you’ll never have to work for rest of your life, regardless whether it is for yourself or someone else.

    # July 12, 2013 at 8:55 pm

    @JoshWhite, I have two kids at home. My road to becoming self-employed is purely motivated by the fact I want to spend time with them while they’re young. If I have to take a pay cut, for me it’s worth it. I guess it all depends if you’re living above/below your means.

    # July 12, 2013 at 9:05 pm

    >Freelancing or being self employed as independent contractor are entirely two different things. If you freelance you still most likely have to answer to some independent agency (employer) who gets jobs and acts as a middle man between you (who will do the work) and customer.

    Incorrect. Even from a legal (non-semantic) perspective.

    In most jurisdictions, “freelance” means working for yourself, and providing a service to a client. Where as a “contractor” may mean working under some form of contract for someone, and is the environment you work under if you work via an agency or similar.

    There is a reason it’s called “contractor”. ;)

    # July 12, 2013 at 9:32 pm

    :) Had to Google this to prove you wrong! Oh well.

    Definition of freelance: These workers are sometimes represented by a company or an agency that resells their labor and that of others to its clients with or without project management and labor contributed by its regular employees.

    Definition of contractor: Natural person, business or corporation which provides goods or services to another entity under terms specified in a contract ;)

    # July 12, 2013 at 9:39 pm

    You’re incorrect, at least by legal definition in Australia, the US and the UK. I can’t speak for all countries.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freelancer

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contractor

    # July 12, 2013 at 9:42 pm

    But we’re arguing semantics, so there’s no black and white right or wrong, though it matters if someone’s trying to understand what role is available. And I don’t 100% agree with Wikipedia, if an agency is reselling my services then I’m under contract with them, and hence – legally – a contractor.

    # July 12, 2013 at 10:01 pm

    Let me give you example of freelance. You are unemployed and can’t find full time job so you go to temp agency. They already made contract with some employer to help them with their needs so they offer that job to you. There is no contract involved on your part. You can walk away anytime without any liability. On the other hand if you are self employed independent contractor and you make contract with customer and don’t deliver, what do you think will happen?

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    # July 12, 2013 at 10:14 pm

    boys, boys…

    @jurotek:

    temp agencies do not hand out work without contracts. _They_ have a contract with their client, _you_ have a contract with them. There _is_ liability, even if it is just the consequence of being blacklisted for walking out on a job. (temp agencies _do_ talk to each other).

    In general, yes, there is a difference in meaning between “freelancer” and “contractor.” That does not make to two mutually exclusive, however, much less “entirely different things.”

    The defining characteristic of being a “Freelancer” is that you’re not bound to any particular employer – i.e., you are “free” to take the jobs you choose.

    (BTW:

    >_Definition of freelance: These workers are_ **sometimes** _represented by a company or an agency_ …
    (emphasis added)

    The defining characteristic of being a “Contractor” is providing your services under the terms of a contract. Ideally, _all_ freelancers would have a contract with their employers (be they clients, agencies, other freelancers, or whoever). It’s just a good idea.

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