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Eclectic Barbering & Cosmetology School website…feedback?

  • # September 10, 2010 at 5:59 pm

    Just about to launch this new site:

    http://www.cruinstitute.net

    We did all branding, logo, design, copy and coding for this new school. We didn’t choose the colors though! ;)

    Site is a pretty robust WordPress site with lots of functional jQuery. The dropdown nav is my favorite I’ve done yet, got a Superfish menu to have transitions when closing! :)

    Site should degrade really well and work on everything except IE6 (of course)

    # September 10, 2010 at 6:53 pm

    Looks good, but looks really bad in Opera :(
    When using 960gs, you have to use clearfix after every full size grid. Example:








    You can make the code a lot better! Try using only one CSS fail (compressed CSS), add a favicon, jquery.easing.js isn’t found and so on.
    Check out “How I Increased My WordPress Performance and Got My Page Loads to Under 1 Second.”
    And look at sites performance report.

    # September 10, 2010 at 7:06 pm

    Hmm…I checked it in Opera on my end and it looks perfect….weird.

    Otherwise, I’m definitely still doing cleanup, haven’t compressed until right before launch. That Easing was a duplicate (oops) and there is a favicon. Grids are completely cleared to me, also.

    Loadtime I found solid. What kind of connection are you on?

    Edit – I also found most of of those suggestions on GTMetrix just downright unrealistic for production level web design ie..to satisfy clients needs/desires. Especially the overqualified selectors…Just using and styling GravityForms and Superfish menus blows that rank to smithereens and there’s no way around it, at least that I’m aware of. :(

    It’s a damn cool utility but I have to take it with a grain of salt. Muchos gracias, sir.

    # September 10, 2010 at 7:21 pm

    Why Opera is crapshoot?
    And in every browser there is horizontal scrollbar. Something is messed up. And you are not using clearfix normally. Why your using br class=”clear” 960gs clearfix is better :)

    # September 10, 2010 at 7:24 pm

    Opera always ends up doing something weird when every other browser (including IE) works great…I find that pretty lame. Analytics also shows me its 1% of most all my websites…just too small to care.

    Edit – I found the scrollbar issue, thanks for that catch. I had an overflow set to scroll on HTML element, was testing something a while back and it got left there.

    Still not sure what you are meaning about the clearfix, though.

    # September 10, 2010 at 7:35 pm

    Ok, show me some websites that “do something weird” :)

    1680 x 1050, and horizontal scrollbar. On my laptop also.

    Don’t use


    , use

    960gs clearfix is better than yours.

    # September 10, 2010 at 7:45 pm

    I notice little difference, but I’ll bite…I switched the CSS to use the 960 Clearfix.

    As far as Opera, notice the “to top” button in the bottom right that appears. Every browser works fine with this script (its pretty popular) but Opera chokes itself on it. It scrolls to the top, but then has a seizure and you see the entire page double up on itself. Only Opera does this. Are you showing the same thing? I’m using the latest version (on a PC here).

    And empty divs are not your friend! Applying the class to a


    tag is more semantic.

    # September 10, 2010 at 8:01 pm

    In Firefox “to top” also isn’t the smoothest thing. Thats scripts false, not Opera or Firefox.

    br is for a line break, using it as a clearfix is like making a layout with tables :)

    # September 10, 2010 at 8:04 pm

    Your not doing anything but clearing the divs, nothing is ‘semantic’ about that.

    # September 10, 2010 at 8:05 pm

    Well, to ultimately mince the logic, I feel that a clear should be applied to the next element in line of the site structure, rather than using any kind of empty div or arbitrary tag just for clearing floats…but that’s not always an option and is just web design as it stands, its not fully semantic yet. I find using it this way is better than filling the HTML structure with empty divs all over and the effect is the same.

    So, I’ll have to kindly disagree, but thanks for the input. :)

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